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Thread: To


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    To

    This is correct.
    1. I need you to kill him to get the money.

    How come this is not incorrect?
    2. You have the opportunity to respond to disputed information.

    Is this correct? What does it mean?
    3. You have the opportunity to respond to dispute information.

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    #2
    2 is correct, but 'disputed'would be an adjective- 'inforation that is disputed'.

    3 is not correct- you would either respond to or dispute, not both.

  1. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: To

    (3) May be interpreted as 'you have the opportunity to respond in order to dispute [the] information', which would indicate the purpose of the response.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: To

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    3. You have the opportunity to respond to dispute information.
    I agree with MM on 3).

    'to dispute' could function as an adverbial phrase:

    Q: Why do I have/get the opportunity to respond?
    A: You have/get the opportunity to respond in order to dispute the claims made against you.

    All the best, :D


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    #5
    So this is an exception here, where after 'to' you don't use the base word? How do you know this? Could you give me some more examples?

    1. You have the opportunity to respond to disputed information.

  3. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #6
    'You have the opportunity to respond to disputed information'-- the 'to' is not grammatically associated with 'disputed' at all, Jack. The word units are 'respond to' (2-word verb collocation) and 'disputed information' (adj + n)'

    I responded to disputed information.
    I responded to the disputed information.
    I reacted against disputed information.
    I waited for improved information.

    Hope this helps.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    So this is an exception here, where after 'to' you don't use the base word? How do you know this? Could you give me some more examples?

    1. You have the opportunity to respond to disputed information.
    Here's a trick: If you can add the words 'in order to' then you can use a base verb, like this,

    A. You have the opportunity to respond in order to dispute information. (OK)

    In A., 'in order to' functions as an adverb and so if you can add it to the sentence and the sentence sounds good, then you know that 'to' is functioning as part of a verb (i.e., a to-infinitive verb) because adverbs modify verbs.

    If you can't add 'in order to', then you know 'to' is not functioning as part of an infinitive verb, and if it's not functioning as part of a verb, then it must be a preposition. There are two to's: 1) the to-infinitive, which is a verb form, and 2) the preposition to. As a preposition 'to' takes an object, like, say, 'information':

    EX: to respond to information
    in order to respond to information (Verb)
    in order to respond to information (Preposition + Object)

    In B. below, 'in order to' doesn't work, which tells us that 'to' is not a verb form:

    B. You have the opportunity to respond in order to disputed information. (Not OK)

    In B. 'disputed' functions as an adjective. It tells us what kind of information. Here's the test:

    Q: What kind of information do you have the opportunity to respond to?
    A: Disputed information. (Adjective)

    In short, if you aren't sure if you should use 'to' + base form or 'to' + object, add the words "in order to".

    EX: I want to go to see her.

    What is the function of 'to'? Is it part of a verb or is it a preposition? Let's test it:

    I want to go in order to see her. (OK)

    'to' functions as part of a verb; it's an infinitive verb form, so the verb 'see' should be in its base form.

    All the best, :D


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    #8
    Thanks.

    Are these correct?
    1. All you need to do is re-install this thing.
    2. All you need to do is to re-install this thing.

    Is 'to' necessary here? What does it mean with 'to' and without 'to'?

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks.

    Are these correct?
    1. All you need to do is re-install this thing.
    2. All you need to do is to re-install this thing.

    Is 'to' necessary here? What does it mean with 'to' and without 'to'?
    The carry the same meaning; 'to' is not necessary. :D


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    #10
    Are these correct? What do they mean?

    1. We can't send him to military school.
    2. We can't send him to the military school.

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