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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default don't sign nothing

    don't sign nothing

    is that a correct way of saying it????

  2. #2
    2006 is offline Key Member
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    don't sign nothing
    don't sign anything

    is that a correct way of saying it????
    2006

  3. #3
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    don't sign nothing

    is that a correct way of saying it????
    Yes, it's correct, Unreg. It's just not standard English. In speech we often use double negatives and this sounds like a perfect example where the double negative adds some extra emphasis.

  4. #4
    2006 is offline Key Member
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Yes, it's correct, Unreg. It's just not standard English. In speech we often use double negatives and this sounds like a perfect example where the double negative adds some extra emphasis.
    I think that promoting bad English and trying to justify it by saying it adds emphasis is very questionable.

  5. #5
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    I think that promoting bad English and trying to justify it by saying it adds emphasis is very questionable.
    Not questionable at all, 2006. I see and hear it done all the time.

    But there is no need to use terms like "bad grammar," "fractured syntax," and "incorrect usage" when referring to rural and Black dialects. ... using terms like "bad grammar" for "nonstandard" is both insulting and scientifically inaccurate.

    Grammar Puss - Steven Pinker

    The aspects of some prescriptivist works ... illustrate ways in which those works let their users down. Where being ungrammatical is confused with merely being informal, there is a danger that the student of English will not be taught how to speak in a normal informal way, but will sound stilted and unnatural, like an inexpert reader reading something out of a book.

    [The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language at page 10]
    Last edited by riverkid; 04-Jul-2008 at 15:29.

  6. #6
    2006 is offline Key Member
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Not questionable at all, 2006. I see and hear it done all the time.
    But there is no need to use terms like "bad grammar," "fractured syntax," and "incorrect usage" when referring to rural and Black dialects. ... using terms like "bad grammar" for "nonstandard" is both insulting and scientifically inaccurate.

    Grammar Puss - Steven Pinker[/quote[
    But the question is, how many dialects are you going to teach to ESL students at one time? It seems much more sensible and realistic to teach standard English and allow students to pick up other dialects if and when they are exposed to them. Many ESL students will never be exposed to "rural and Black dialects".
    Last edited by RonBee; 17-Sep-2009 at 22:31. Reason: fix quote

  7. #7
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Not questionable at all, 2006. I see and hear it done all the time.
    But the question is, how many dialects are you going to teach to ESL students at one time? It seems much more sensible and realistic to teach standard English and allow students to pick up other dialects if and when they are exposed to them. Many ESL students will never be exposed to "rural and Black dialects".
    Indeed it does seem an eminently sensible thing to stick to standard English, 2006. But when ESLs do ask there is no reason to mislead them. Double negatives are not simply found in rural and Black dialects. They are common in the speech of speakers of standard English too.

    Quite obviously, from the questions we get here all the time, ESLs are being exposed to a lot of different dialects of English.

  8. #8
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
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    Default re: Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    But the question is, how many dialects are you going to teach to ESL students at one time? It seems much more sensible and realistic to teach standard English and allow students to pick up other dialects if and when they are exposed to them. Many ESL students will never be exposed to "rural and Black dialects".
    Knowledge, however, is power. In teaching a word or phrase, providing its variants then and there empowers learners. (Just ask them.) Students of English will and do come across variants all the time, thanks to American movies, TV, and, of course, the Internet, especially online chat. That don't sign nothing is correct (or not) is a completely different topic, given that "correct" is a subjective term, not to mention has its history in prescriptivism, and as teachers we should be aware of that from the get-go.

    • Do people say it? Yes.
    • Is it considered Standard English? No.
    That's all that students need to know.

  9. #9
    $portytheking is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Is this right?

    techniccally no it not the right term would be if you said i cant do othing it would be i cant do anything

  10. #10
    magelarocque is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Is this right?

    No. You have used a double negative. The correct sentence would be: Don't sign anything.
    If you say "Don't sign nothing", you are telling someone to sign something.

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