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  1. #1
    nicolas Guest

    Default I shouldn't be surprised and half.

    Dear all,

    I have a question when I saw the movie "Love Actually".
    The scripts are as below (they are in a wedding party):

    A: This DJ, what do you reckon? The worst in history?
    B: Probably. I think it all hangs on the next song.
    DJ: Now here’s the one for the lovers. That’s quite a few of you, I shouldn’t be surprised and half.


    My question is what does the "half" mean?
    We usually say "half an hour", "half a dozen eggs".
    Why doesn't it have a noun? Or this is a phrase? :wink:

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: I shouldn't be surprised and half.

    Quote Originally Posted by nicolas
    Dear all,

    I have a question when I saw the movie "Love Actually".
    The scripts are as below (they are in a wedding party):

    A: This DJ, what do you reckon? The worst in history?
    B: Probably. I think it all hangs on the next song.
    DJ: Now here’s the one for the lovers. That’s quite a few of you, I shouldn’t be surprised and half.


    My question is what does the "half" mean?
    We usually say "half an hour", "half a dozen eggs".
    Why doesn't it have a noun? Or this is a phrase? :wink:

    Thanks
    In North American English it would be "I shouldn't be surprised if half (of you are lovers)."

    All the best,

  3. #3
    nicolas Guest

    Default

    Dear Casiopea,

    Thank you! :D
    Now I understand what it means.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default

    You're welcome.

  5. #5
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    You're welcome.
    According to my Longman, the expression "and a half" is used for emphasis when you think something is very unusual, surprising, or good.

    I would say it something like this:

    I wouldn't be surprised at all if quite a few of you are lovers.

    OR I wouldn't be too surprised if quite a few of you were lovers.


    :wink:

  6. #6
    nicolas Guest

    Default

    Dear Susie,

    Thank you.

    According to my Longman, the expression "and a half" is used for emphasis when you think something is very unusual, surprising, or good.
    But I can't find sentences mach this explanation. :wink:
    Could you please give me some sentences to show me how to use it?
    Thanks! :D

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    We also use 'not half' as an emphatic positive:

    Did you enjoy the party?
    Not half!


  8. #8
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nicolas
    Dear Susie,

    Thank you.

    According to my Longman, the expression "and a half" is used for emphasis when you think something is very unusual, surprising, or good.
    But I can't find sentences mach this explanation. :wink:
    Could you please give me some sentences to show me how to use it?
    Thanks! :D
    Sure thing! :wink:

    (Quoting Longman): and a half informal used when you think that something is very unusual or surprising, or very good: That was a meal and a half!

  9. #9
    nicolas Guest

    Default

    Dear todl and Susie,

    Thank you, I will remember these, not half and and a half.
    :D :D

    These are sentences and a half.
    It's not half hard to remember these phrases. :wink:

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