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  1. #1
    jsusea Guest

    Abstract and Concrete Nouns

    Please help me. I need to know if my answers are correct.

    1. concrete (citizen) Jose Rizal was a model citizen of our country.
    2. abstract (stories) As a boy, he was fond of reading stories.
    3. abstract (lessons) But his mother taught him to study his lessons first.
    4. abstract (pleasure) In this way, Rizal attended to duty first instead of pleasure.
    5. abstract (self-control) He grew up to be a man of great self-control.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: Abstract and Concrete Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by jsusea View Post
    Please help me. I need to know if my answers are correct.

    1. concrete (citizen) Jose Rizal was a model citizen of our country.
    2. abstract (stories) As a boy, he was fond of reading stories.
    3. abstract (lessons) But his mother taught him to study his lessons first.
    4. abstract (pleasure) In this way, Rizal attended to duty first instead of pleasure.
    5. abstract (self-control) He grew up to be a man of great self-control.
    All are oK.

  3. #3
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    Soup is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Abstract and Concrete Nouns

    2. abstract (stories) As a boy, he was fond of reading stories. <I can read a story; see it. I can hear a story.>
    3. abstract (lessons) But his mother taught him to study his lessons first. <I can study a lesson; see it and hear it>

    Examples of abstract terms include love, success, freedom, good, moral, democracy, and any -ism (chauvinism, Communism, feminism, racism, sexism). These terms are fairly common and familiar, and because we recognize them we may imagine that we understand themóbut we really can't, because the meanings won't stay still.
    Take love as an example. You've heard and used that word since you were three or four years old. Does it mean to you now what it meant to you when you were five? when you were ten? when you were fourteen (!)? I'm sure you'll share my certainty that the word changes meaning when we marry, when we divorce, when we have children, when we look back at lost parents or spouses or children. The word stays the same, but the meaning keeps changing.

    Concrete terms refer to objects or events that are available to the senses. [This is directly opposite to abstract terms, which name things that are not available to the senses.] Examples of concrete terms include spoon, table, velvet eye patch, nose ring, sinus mask, green, hot, walking. Because these terms refer to objects or events we can see or hear or feel or taste or smell, their meanings are pretty stable. If you ask me what I mean by the word spoon, I can pick up a spoon and show it to you. [I can't pick up a freedom and show it to you, or point to a small democracy crawling along a window sill. I can measure sand and oxygen by weight and volume, but I can't collect a pound of responsibility or a liter of moral outrage.]
    While abstract terms like love change meaning with time and circumstances, concrete terms like spoon stay pretty much the same. Spoon and hot and puppy mean pretty much the same to you now as they did when you were four.

    Read more here Abstract, Concrete, General and Specific Terms

  4. #4
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: Abstract and Concrete Nouns

    That's the story of my life: that's what always happens to me
    He was nearly hit by a car and learned a lesson about being careful when crossing the street.

    What is my story like? Can any body see, hear or touch my story?
    What is his lesson like? Can any body see, hear or touch the lesson learned by him?

  5. #5
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    Re: Abstract and Concrete Nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas Ranjan Mallick View Post
    story of my life
    learned a lesson
    They're idioms.

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