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  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default accept and except

    Hi,
    I notice no or almost no difference between the pronunciation of these words.
    Are they really pronounced the same way?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    stuartnz is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: accept and except

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi,
    I notice no or almost no difference between the pronunciation of these words.
    Are they really pronounced the same way?
    Thanks.
    (not a professional teacher) In the interests of clarity of meaning, they probably should not be pronounced the same way, but they often are. At least here in NZ, I would say that they are most often almost indistinguishable when spoken, and so the context in which they are used is the only means of determining which is meant.

  3. #3
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: accept and except

    Hi Stuart!
    I personally prefer to pronounce "accept" with a very distinctive "a", like the "a" of "America". Do you think it is a problem?
    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    stuartnz is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: accept and except

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi Stuart!
    I personally prefer to pronounce "accept" with a very distinctive "a", like the "a" of "America". Do you think it is a problem?
    Thanks.
    Not a problem at all. I often make the difference audibly clear if I think there is any possibility of confusion or uncertainty.

  5. #5
    Buddhaheart is offline Member
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    Default Re: accept and except

    At least in theory the <a> in “accept” is pronounced as the unaccented schwa /c/ (a central vowel) while the first <e> in “except” is pronounced as the short /w/ (a mid high front vowel).

  6. #6
    Kevin89 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: accept and except

    I have an Oxford dictionary with very useful pronunciation symbols (IPA) written behind the words. I looked up both words and this is what this dictionary tells me:
    Except: /ɪkˈsept/
    Accept: /əkˈsept/
    Note that even the stress on the syllables are exactly the same. The only difference is that accept starts with a schwa, and that except starts with a /ɪ/ like in <sit>. So there is a difference, but indeed quite hard to tell when the language is spoken in its normal speed.
    PS: The symbols are written in recieved pronunciation accent.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: accept and except

    (not a professional teacher) In common usage in American English, they sound (to my ear) exactly the same.

    Listen to it on Dictionary.com or SpellingCity.com. Sounds the same to me.....

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