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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    strain language to the limits

    Hello, Teachers.

    I see the following sentence in a dictionary:
    Her prose strains language to the limits.

    I'm wondering what is the writer's attitude to 'her prose'. Is he/she praising or criticizing 'her prose'?

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia *^_^*

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    #2

    Re: strain language to the limits

    Her prose strains language to the limits.
    I think that is a negative, derogatory statement rather than a compliment.


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    #3

    Re: strain language to the limits

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    I think that is a negative, derogatory statement rather than a compliment.
    Thank you for your reply :)
    It would be very nice if you could provide some detailed explanation for me.


    • Join Date: Jul 2008
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    #4

    Re: strain language to the limits

    I think this sentence shows that the writer has a good command of her linguistic tools.Language is compared to a lemon that she squeezes to the end.


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    #5

    Re: strain language to the limits

    Hi, Teachers.

    I was wondering if you could show me some detailed explanation.

    Thank you very much in advance.

    Best regards.

    Enydia *^_^*

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    #6

    Re: strain language to the limits

    (not a professional teacher) I think it implies that she straining the language almost to the point at which it breaks, like a rope, or perhaps a container, so badly packed and overfilled that it is in danger of bursting. It is a common expression, and is very definitely not a compliment.

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