Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    reginaregina is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default why the third person singular has no tense here?

    I met the sentence on our university's website. "A student posted a 'Babysitter Available' ad, and received an offer to become employed by an idividual on the condition the student open a Bank of America bank account and provide the account information." Noticed "open" and "provide" have no -s or -ed here, I am confused. Are they supposed to go with " the student"? Thank you.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,822
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: why the third person singular has no tense here?

    Quote Originally Posted by reginaregina View Post
    I met the sentence on our university's website. "A student posted a 'Babysitter Available' ad, and received an offer to become employed by an idividual on the condition the student open a Bank of America bank account and provide the account information." Noticed "open" and "provide" have no -s or -ed here, I am confused. Are they supposed to go with " the student"? Thank you.
    "The student should open a Bank of America bank account and provide the account information." If it was written like this it is correct.

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,874
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: why the third person singular has no tense here?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "The student should open a Bank of America bank account and provide the account information." If it was written like this it is correct.
    I'd like to disagree. The hiring person is not suggesting that the student "should" do anything. He is mandating that the student do something, or not get the job. It's subjunctive. Of course, it could have been written as above, but it wasn't.

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,822
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: why the third person singular has no tense here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'd like to disagree. The hiring person is not suggesting that the student "should" do anything. He is mandating that the student do something, or not get the job. It's subjunctive. Of course, it could have been written as above, but it wasn't.
    Well obviously, if they want the job they should... if not then they should not.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,874
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: why the third person singular has no tense here?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Well obviously, if they want the job they should... if not then they should not.
    Of course, but I think students need to be able to recognise the subjunctive even if they never use it - especially in this form where it does make a difference to the meaning (as opposed to the "If she was / If she were", which doesn't).

    There is a semantic difference - in many English dialects still - between:
    The appeals court agreed that the man should be hanged (which most people believed already).
    The appeals court agreed that the man be hanged (which is worse news for the man than the above).

Similar Threads

  1. present perfect tense & present perfect continuous tense
    By *zaizai~love* in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Oct-2008, 22:06
  2. American slang words
    By thug_until_I_die in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Jul-2008, 14:41
  3. Third person singular or plural?
    By Kokopollo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Feb-2006, 16:11
  4. Do we have future tense?
    By shun in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Oct-2003, 17:06
  5. Proper terms of expressions/phrases
    By Piak in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Feb-2003, 18:26

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •