Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31

Thread: A

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks.
    You're welcome. :D

    correction: You could get all that if you paid the fee.

  2. #12
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,310
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    1. She has feet fetish. :D :(

    Well, actually, it sounds odd at first glance given that the common phrase is "foot fetish". It's not common for 'feet' a plural noun to functions as an adjective, but it could be considered OK if 'feet fetish' refers to a fetish for different kinds of feet, say, non-human feet. But in that case, and since 'fetish' is a count noun, either 'a' or -s should be added,

    EX: She has a feet fetish. (fetish for all kinds of feet)
    EX: She has feet fetishes. (various kinds of fetishes for all kinds of feet)

    But, again, 'feet fetish' is not the common form. It's a made up phrase.
    I've never met anyone with such a fetish.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Are these correct? What do they mean?

    1. I applied for a manager position.
    2. I applied for the manager position.

    3. They weren't hiring for the manager position.
    4. They weren't hiring for a manager position.
    5. They weren't hiring for manager position.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. I applied for a manager position. :D
    2. I applied for the manager position. :D

    In 1., the speaker uses 'a' to express a non-specific position. That is, the speaker doesn't say which company and/or depatment the position is with.
    In 2., the speaker uses 'the' to express a specific position, one that both the speaker and listener know about.

    Quote Originally Posted by "jack"3. They weren't hiring for [b
    the[/b] manager position. :D
    4. They weren't hiring for a manager position. :D
    5. They weren't hiring for manager position. :(
    In 3., 'the' refers to a specific position; in 4., 'a' refers to a non-specific position; in 5., since 'position' is a noun, and nouns require a determiner, either a(n) or the should be used.

    A note about adjectives, 'manager' is a noun in form but an adjective in function. We know this because we can test it by deleting it:

    for a manager position. => for a position. (OK)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks.

    Are these incorrect without the article 'a'?
    1.I want a dog and a cat.
    2. I want a dog and cat.

    3. I want a Porsche and BMW.
    4. I want a Porsche and a BMW.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks.

    Are these incorrect without the article 'a'?
    1. I want a dog and a cat.
    2. I want a dog and cat.

    3. I want a Porsche and BMW.
    4. I want a Porsche and a BMW.
    Well, 'a' would be best because e.g. the dog and the cat are separate. :wink:

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks.

    Are these correct?
    1. Do you have massage therapy help here? (I don't need the article 'a' here right? Because 'massage therapy' is not countable?)
    2. Do you have a massage therapy help here? (Is this correct?)

    3. Do you have a massage therapist here?
    4. Do you have a massage therapist help here? (What does this mean?)
    5. Do you have massage therapists here? (This is correct, right?)

    6. Do you have massage therapy help here?
    7. Do you have massage therapy here?
    What does #6 and #7 mean?

    What is the subject and verb for this:
    8. What does #6 and #7 mean?

    What do these mean?
    9. We used to offer a 30 day guarantee.
    10. We used to offer 30 days guarantee.

    Are these incorrect?
    11. We used to offer 30 day guarantee.
    12. We used to offer a 30 days guarantee.

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    13. I get a base paid and commission.
    14. I get a base paid and a commission. (How come this doesn't sound right with the article 'a'?)
    I5. I get a base paid and commissions.
    What does #13 and #15 mean?

    Is #15 wrong? The article 'a' shouldn't be there right? B/C 'peace of mind' is not countable?
    16. We provide a peace of mind.
    17. We provide peace of mind.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've underlined the nouns:

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. Do you have massage therapy help here? :D
    2. Do you have a massage therapy help here? :(
    3. Do you have a massage therapist here? :(
    4. Do you have a massage therapist help here? :(
    5. Do you have massage therapists here? :D
    6. Same as 1. above
    7. Do you have massage therapy here? :D

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    What is the subject and verb for this:
    8. What does #6 and #7 mean?
    Question formation:
    What (object) does (aux. verb) #6 (subject) and (conjunction) #7 (subject) mean (main verb)?
    Statement:
    #6 and #7 (subject) do (aux. verb) mean (main verb) what (object)?

    Try: What do #6 and #7 mean? ~ What do they mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    9. We used to offer a 30 day guarantee. :D
    10. We used to offer 30 days guarantee.
    11. We used to offer 30 day guarantee. :(
    12. We used to offer a 30 days guarantee. :([/quote]

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    13. I get a base pay and commission. (together) :D
    14. I get a base pay and a commission. (separately) :D
    I5. I get a base pay and commissions. :D (separately)
    [qoute="jack"]
    16. We provide a peace of mind. :( (a kind of peace of mind )
    17. We provide peace of mind. :D [/quote]

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks.

    Are these correct? What do these mean?
    1. We used to offer a 30 day guarantee.
    2. We used to offer a 30 day guaranteed.
    3. We used to offer 30 days guaranteed. (You're not sure if this is correct or not right?)

    4. Do you have a massage therapist here? (Why can't I use the determiner here? Isn't 'therapist' countable?)

    correction: You could get all that if you paid the fee.
    I have to used 'the' in that sentence? Is it because it is a specific 'fee'?)

    Try: What do #6 and #7 mean? ~ What do they mean?
    What kills him? (In this sentence 'what' is the subject right?)

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    1. We used to offer a 30 day guarantee.
    2. We used to offer a 30 day guaranteed.
    3. We used to offer 30 days guaranteed. (You're not sure if this is correct or not right?)

    1. is OK; 2. is not OK. 'guarantee' (noun).
    4. is OK.

    You could get all that if you paid the fee. (OK. Specific fee e.g., our fee)
    What kills him? (Subject)

    Subject Test:
    What kills him?
    Writing an essay kills him. (makes him dread/hate life)
    Watching his brother wash clothes kills him. (makes him laugh at life)

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •