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Thread: A

  1. #21
    TheMadBaron Guest
    He applied for a managerial position, and he had a foot fetish, not a 'feet' fetish.

  2. #22
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    Re: A

    Thanks.

    2. We used to offer a 30 day guaranteed.
    I don't get it.
    But this is correct:
    1. I have a damaged car. (How do I know when to add -ed after the article 'a' Is there any rule?)

    2. I was eating a sliced of tomato. (How do you know this one is wrong?)

    3. I was eating a slice of tomato.

    What do these mean?
    4. I was eating a slice of tomato.
    5. I was eating a slice of tomatoes. (Does this mean I ate a slice of it from many tomatoes?)

    Are these correct?
    6. Is there any rule? ('any' is plural so is this wrong b/c 'rule' is not plural?)
    7. Are there any rules?

    8. I get a salary job.
    9. I get a salaried job. (How do you know when to add -ed after the article 'a'?

  3. #23
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    Re: A

    1. 'a' has nothing to do with whether the word takes -ed or not. It has to do with the word's origin: Verbs used as adjectives tend to end in -ed. Verb: damage => Adjective: damaged
    2. is not OK. Nouns tend to come before 'of'.
    5. is odd.

    6. Is there any (one particular) rule? (OK)
    8. I have a salary job.
    9. salaried job (Not OK; see 1. 'salary' is a noun; it does not come from a verb. If 'salary' were a verb, then we could add -ed and make it an adjective *salary => *salaried. But it's not a verb.)

  4. #24
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    Re: A

    Thanks.

    1. 'a' has nothing to do with whether the word takes -ed or not. It has to do with the word's origin: Verbs used as adjectives tend to end in -ed. Verb: damage => Adjective: damaged
    How do I know if it acts as a verb or noun? Is there a dictionary that I can check? Can I also check this on my own?

  5. #25
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    Re: A

    The dictionary is your best bet. Try the free, online dictionary, OneLook.

  6. #26
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    Re: A

    Thanks.


    8. I get a salary job.

    9. I get a salaried job. (How do you know when to add -ed after the article 'a'?


    9. salaried job (Not OK; see 1. 'salary' is a noun; it does not come from a verb. If 'salary' were a verb, then we could add -ed and make it an adjective *salary => *salaried. But it's not a verb.)
    What about this?
    1. I got salaried jobs. (This is a to-be sentence, but this is wrong? It should be 'salary' because it is a noun not a verb? For words like this, I have to look it up if it is a noun or verb, if I am uncertain right?)
    2. I got salary jobs.

    Are these correct? If not, why?

    3. The job is salary.
    4. The job is salaried.
    9. We used to offer a 30 day guarantee. :D
    5. We used to offer a 30 day guaranteed. (Is 'guaranteed' wrong? Is it because it acts as a noun not adjective?)

    So these are wrong with 'guaranteed' right?
    6. There is a guarantee(d) for this product.
    7. We used to offer a guarantee(d) for this product.


    Last edited by jack; 08-Nov-2004 at 05:37.

  7. #27
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    Re: A


    1. I got salaried jobs. (This is a to-be sentence, but this is wrong? It should be 'salary' because it is a noun not a verb? For words like this, I have to look it up if it is a noun or verb, if I am uncertain right?)


    You're right.

    4. The job is salaried.


    5. We used to offer a 30 day guaranteed. (Is 'guaranteed' wrong? Is it because it acts as a noun not adjective?)
    You're right, and you're also right about 6. and 7. being ungrammatical.

  8. #28
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    Re: A

    Test:

    Q: What kind of job?

    Are both of these correct?
    A 1.: A salary job.
    A 2.: A salaried job.

    If so, why isn't this correct?
    3. I got a salaried job. (I'm confused. 'salary' is not an adjective, is it? How can I test this?)

    Are these correct? If not, why?
    4. I am with Jack.
    5. I am with a cat.
    6. I am with cat. (How come this isn't correct with 'a'? Isn't 'Jack' countable? He is a person?)
    7. I am with a Jack. (How come I don't 'a' here? 'Jack' is not countable?

    Well, 'a' would be best because e.g. the dog and the cat are separate. :wink:
    So this is okay right?
    8. I want a dog and cat. (How come I don't need a determiner for 'cat'? I know I can put it there if I like. But why isn't it wrong without it?)

    Is this okay?
    9. I want dog and a cat? (If not, why?)

    the dog and the cat are separate.
    Is this okay? When I say this, a reader knows 'the' is omitted right?
    10. The dog and (the) cat are separate.

    For the one above, is it better to use #12? Why?
    11. Wen I say this, a reader knows 'the' is omitted right?
    12. Wen I say this, the reader knows 'the' is omitted right?

    For formal writing #14 is incorrect right?
    13. This is a dog and a cat. (Okay for speaking?)
    13. This is a dog and this is a cat.
    Last edited by jack; 15-Nov-2004 at 13:01.

  9. #29
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    Re: A

    Both are OK. 1. is common:

    A 1.: A salary job. => The job comes with a salary.
    A 2.: A salaried job. => The job is salaried. (A salary is given)
    A 3.: I got a salaried job. => The job is salaried (A salary is given)

    'with cat' means, to be pregnant with a cat (i.e., I am with child means, I am pregnant:

    6. I am with cat. (OK, but odd--are you a mad scientist? )
    7. I am with a Jack. (OK, 'a' means, any Jack)

    Wife: Who are you with?
    Husband: I'm with a Jack (i.e., I don't want to say which Jack, so I use 'a')
    Wife: 'a Jack'? Why won't you say which Jack? Are you trying to hide something from me?

    8. I want a dog and cat. (OK. It means, I want them as a pair.)
    9. I want dog and a cat? (Not OK. The determiner needs to come first. English is a head first language, so modifiers need to come first; the second modifier can be omitted, as in 10 below.)

    10. The dog and (the) cat are separate.

    As for 11. and 12., since you're talking about a specific reader (the person who will read your sentence) use 'the':

    11. When I say this, a reader knows 'the' is omitted right? (Odd)
    12. When I say this, the reader knows 'the' is omitted right? (OK)

    13. This is a dog and a cat. (OK)
    14. This is a dog, and this is a cat. (OK, but use a comma)

  10. #30
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    Re: A

    Thanks.
    A 3.: I got a salaried job. => The job is salaried (A salary is given)
    What do these mean?
    1. I got a salaried job. (This is correct?)
    How come this isn't correct?
    2. I get a salaried job.

    What do these mean?
    3. I got a salaried job.
    4. I got a salary job.

    5. This is a salary job.
    6. This is a salaried job.
    Last edited by jack; 17-Nov-2004 at 11:23.

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