Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: That

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default That

    Are these correct? What is the subject and verb?

    1. They always drive over the dotted lines and that piss me off.
    2. They always drive over the dotted lines and that pisses me off.
    What is 'that' refering to?[/b]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: That

    1. They always drive over the dotted lines and that piss me off.
    2. They always drive over the dotted lines and that pisses me off.
    Sentence 1. is ungrammatical. The verb 'piss' needs to agree in number with its subject: 'that pisses'. Sentence 2. is grammatical.

    Structure
    that (subject; relative pronoun, singular)
    pisses (verb, singular)

    'that' refers back to one clause: 'They always drive over the dotted-line'. You could replace the relative pronoun with another singular pronoun "it", like this,

    It pisses me off.

    You could also replace the relative pronoun with "The fact that", like this,

    The fact that they always drive over the dotted-line pisses me off.
    => The underlined portion functions as the subject. It's one clause, so it agrees in singular number with the verb:

    They always drive over the dotted-line = It/That

    You could also omit 'The fact', like this,

    That they always drive over the dotted-line pisses me off.

    Note, 'dotted-line' does not require an -s to express all the dots in the line. It means the line is dotted (i.e., one line that's dotted, a dotted-line).

    All the best, :D

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,370
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Don't say that something pisses you off to your boss, too.

    FRC

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What does these mean? What happens if I add 'that' to it?

    1. Just because a computer comes with an integrated video card (that) doesn't mean you can't upgrade. (How come this is correct? It doesn't sound right without 'that'?

    2. Just because a computer comes with an integrated video card that doesn't mean you can't upgrade.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    What does these mean? What happens if I add 'that' to it?

    1. Just because a computer comes with an integrated video card (that) doesn't mean you can't upgrade. (How come this is correct? It doesn't sound right without 'that'?

    2. Just because a computer comes with an integrated video card that doesn't mean you can't upgrade.
    As written, sentence 1. is not OK; however, if the speaker is changing her/his mind mid-sentence, then a pause (....) should be added, like this,

    1b. Just because a computer comes with an integrated video card.... That doesn't mean you can't upgrade.

    The pronoun 'That' refers back to the the string 'Just because a computer comes with an integrated video card'. Both function as the subject of 'doesn't mean':

    That doesn't mean.... (OK)
    Just because....doesn't mean. (OK)

    so only one or the other is possible as subject, not both.

    All the best, :D

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Are these correct? If not, why?

    1. Both function as the subject of 'doesn't mean'.
    2. Both functions as the subject of 'doesn't mean'. (How come 'function' is not plural?)

    3. Both cars are okay.
    4. Both car is okay.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    1. Both function as the subject of 'doesn't mean'. :D
    2. Both functions as the subject of 'doesn't mean'. :(
    3. Both cars are okay. :D
    4. Both car is okay. :(

    In 2. and 4., 'functions' and 'cars' are singular. They should be plural. 'Both' means, two, so the very is plural: 'are/were'. :wink:

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    n 2. and 4., 'functions' and 'cars' are singular. They should be plural. 'Both' means, two, so the very is plural: 'are/were'.
    Why is this incorrect? I don't get it.
    1. Both functions as the subject of 'doesn't mean'.

    so the very is plural:
    What does this mean? I don't get the 'very' part?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Why is this incorrect? I don't get it.
    2. Both functions as the subject.
    Well, the subject has been omitted, so let's fill it in:

    2a. Both words functions as the subject. (Not OK)

    The subject 'words' is a plural noun so its verb needs to be plural, too, like this,

    2b. Both words function as the subject. (OK)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Oh, interesting.

    How would people know if it is omitted or not? I see this on the tv somtimes too and I don't understand why sometimes it is plural or whatsoever.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk