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  1. #1
    Maluues is offline Junior Member
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    Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    Hey there.

    I have got two questions relating to the position of adverbs.

    Lets use:
    Charley plays football.

    Would I say:

    Charly plays football very often. I would use this one.

    or

    Charley very often plays football

    or Charley plays very often football.

    The second question:

    Again it is Charley.

    Carley plays fooball very good

    or Charley plays football very well. I would use this one.

    Could you explain why I have to use these positions?

    Cheers

    edit: The topic should be called: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs.
    Last edited by Maluues; 18-Jul-2008 at 15:55.

  2. #2
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    re: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    Charley very often plays football.
    Charley often plays football.
    Charley plays football (very) often.
    Charley plays very often football.

    Charley plays fooball very good. <e.g., USA colloquial>
    Charley plays football very well. <Standard English>

    See here English Grammar - Adverbs - Position in a Sentence - Word Power

  3. #3
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    re: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    Wow. Soup - I think that site is a bit of an overwhelming mishmash for a beginner.

    Here's another site with more units, and exercises:
    http://www.eslau.ca/lesson/unit66.php

    Unit 66: POSITION OF ADVERBS
    Some adverbs can go at the beginning of the sentence:

    (Sometimes we go swimming) and in the middle (We sometimes go swimming) and at the end (We go swimming sometimes).

    But many adverbs cannot go in all of these positions.

    1
    If an adverb describes an adjective or another adverb, it goes before it:
    nearly correct
    always late
    very carefully

    BUT the adverb enough (Unit 67) goes after it:
    correct enough
    early enough
    carefully enough

    2
    The adverbs early, late, a little, a lot, well and yet go at the end of the basic sentence (Unit 7):
    We arrived early.
    I like cheese a lot.
    NOT : like a lot cheese

    3
    If the basic sentence is subject and verb only (Unit 62), adverbs showing 'how' (Unit 80) go at the end:
    He works hard.
    She ate slowly.
    NOT : slowly ate

    4
    The adverbs almost, also, hardly, just, nearly, never and still go in the middle of the sentence:

    before the lexical verb (Unit 3)
    We nearly missed the train.

    but after the first auxiliary
    I have never missed it.
    I am still learning.
    and after the verb be
    I am also a teacher.

    NOTICE: Except for the verb be, adverbs cannot go between the verb and another part of the basic sentence (NOT : we go sometimes swimming).

    5
    The rules for the position of adverbs are difficult. If you are not sure where to put an adverb, put it at the end of the basic sentence (most adverbs can go here).

    NOTICE: Different adverb positions sometimes give different meanings to sentences (Unit 67).

  4. #4
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    re: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Charley very often plays football.
    What's wrong with that sentence, Soup?
    It's true that 'very often' would be much more commonly found at the end of the sentence. However, 'very often' can also be used in mid-sentence.

  5. #5
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    re: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    Charley plays fooball very good

    or
    Charley plays football very well.


    Such sentences are found only in grammar books, not actually proceeding out of the mouths of ordinary mortals.

    Charlie is good/really good at football.

    or maybe

    Charlie plays football really well.

  6. #6
    Soup's Avatar
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    re: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    It's true that 'very often' would be much more commonly found at the end of the sentence. However, 'very often' can also be used in mid-sentence.
    True, but with a slighty different emphasis, which is why 'long adverbs' are not as common mid-sentence. For example, In Charley very often plays football, the adverb very often by position directly modifies the verb plays, placing pimary focus on the action plays, rather than on the event plays football, whereas in Charley plays football very often by position modifies the event plays football.
    Marked form
    Ex: Charley very often plays football.
    => Emphasis on plays

    Unmarked form
    Ex: Charley plays football very often.
    => Emphasis on plays football
    Consider,
    The dog [quickly [ate [the food]].
    The dog [ate the food [quickly]].
    Back to our example 'very often', with 'long adverbs' the tendency is to place 'weightier' information at the end of the clause, to make it easier for the listener/reader to process the information. (See also a discussion about frequency adverbs and word order).

  7. #7
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    Re: Two questions relating to the position of adverbs

    this should not be a confusing question

    often is an adverb which can be used directly before the verb

    1. Charley very often plays football correct


    or
    you can put it after the verb but it must be also after the subject

    2. Charly plays football very often. correct


    never
    put it between verb and object

    3. Charley plays very often football. incorrect.




    The second question:


    Carley plays fooball very good incorrect

    because you are talking about how Charlie plays football


    you are describing how he does something - use an adverb not an adjective - use well not good.

    Charley plays football very well. correct


    to describe a noun use an adjective

    he's a good player

    the ball is round

    they have a weak defence

    to describe a verb ( or how someone does something) use an adverb

    he plays well

    their defence played badly
    the supporters shouted loudly


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