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Thread: Scenarios


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    Scenarios

    Letís say this is the scenario:

    Scenario:
    Someone said:
    You are wearing your t-shirt inside out.

    I replied back with:
    1. I intend to. (Is this saying that it is suppose to be like that right now?)
    2. I intended to. (Does this mean that at the moment I put on my t-shirt, I intend to?)

    So which one would you use if they are both correct?

    Scenario:

    Someone asked:
    Should I kill him now?

    I replied back with:
    1. It depends on the situations.
    2. It depends on the situation.

    Which one of these would you use? Is "situations' correct? When you come to situations like this about adding -s, how do you know if you need to make it plural or not?

    BTW are these correct? If so, what's the difference in meaing between them?
    1. When you come to situations like this... (does this mean many situations in the future?)
    2. When you come to a situation like this... (Saying a specific situation?)
    Does it matter which one I use? If so, how do I know which one is better?


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #2
    I don't get if I should use have or had. I don't know which one is correct.

    Here is the scenario:

    12:00PM: Someone calls me and ask if i can work for them

    8PM: I come home, mom tells me that someone called me to work.


    Do I say:
    1. I don't need to call them back. They probably have found someone else to work for them. (Is this correct?)

    2. . I don't need to call them back. They probably had found someone else to work for them. (Is this correct?)

    If both of them are correct, what do they mean?

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    #3
    Use 1 because it is relevant at the time of speaking. In British English, you could also say 'will have found', showing an assumption about a completed action at the time of speaking, but Americans don't seem to like this construction.


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    #4
    Thanks.

    So is it wrong to use #2?

  1. Sam-F
    Guest
    #5

    Re: Scenarios

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Scenario:
    Someone said:
    You are wearing your t-shirt inside out.

    I replied back with:
    1. I intend to. (Is this saying that it is suppose to be like that right now?)
    2. I intended to. (Does this mean that at the moment I put on my t-shirt, I intend to?)


    Scenario:

    Someone asked:
    Should I kill him now?

    I replied back with:
    1. It depends on the situations.
    2. It depends on the situation.

    Senerio:

    1. When you come to situations like this... (does this mean many situations in the future?)
    2. When you come to a situation like this... (Saying a specific situation?)
    Does it matter which one I use? If so, how do I know which one is better?
    Hi Jack,

    in the first case you would use number 1. The person said "you ARE wearing...", and so phrased the question asking about something in the present. Therefore, you have to respond in the present. Had the other person said "you put on your t-shirt backwards," then you would have to respond with the second reply, as the question would have been asking about an event that happened in the past (ie. you putting on your t-shirt).

    In the second case both replies are ok, though I think most people would go for the second. "Situations" usually refers to different situations, but people would normally call the conditions at any one time the "situation." Thus, the second reply is saying "it depends on WHICH situation we find ourselves in." However, the first may also be used. BTW, had the word been "circumstance," you would normally make it plural: "It depends on the circumstances." Don't ask me why "situation" would be in the singular and "circumstances" in the plural.


    In the third case, both answers are fine. There are many examples of this:

    -"People who play sports are fit"
    -"A person who plays sports is fit"

    -"Computers should not be thrown from windows"
    -"A computer should not be thrown from a window"

    In all these cases, the subject refers to all things of that type (situations, people, computers). So when you say "People who..." this is like saying "ALL people who...", and when you say "A person who..." this is like saying "EACH or ANY person who...", and both of these mean the same thing.


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    #6
    In all these cases, the subject refers to all things of that type (situations, people, computers). So when you say "People who..." this is like saying "ALL people who...", and when you say "A person who..." this is like saying "EACH or ANY person who...", and both of these mean the same thing.
    Thanks Sam, that was very useful.

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