Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: behalf

  1. #1
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    637
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default behalf

    "I'd like to invite you visit our company on my behalf".

    Do you think the usage "on my behalf" is okay?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: behalf

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHope
    "I'd like to invite you visit our company on my behalf".
    Do you think the usage "on my behalf" is okay?
    on my behalf means, someone does something for me, they do it instead of me, in place of me:

    "I'd like to invite you to visit our company for me. :?

    Try,

    On behalf of our team (i.e., I am saying this for the team, as a representative of the team), I would like to invite you to our company.

    All the best, :D

  3. #3
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    637
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks.

    But what I wanted to know is:

    I invite you to dinner with my family (BAESED ON THE FACT THAT I AM THE REPRESENTATIVE OF MYSELF)

    I didnt' get why "On behalf of our team" works, while "On behalf of myself" fails.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHope
    Thanks.
    But what I wanted to know is: I invite you to dinner with my family (BASED ON THE FACT THAT I AM THE REPRESENTATIVE OF MYSELF). I didnt' get why "On behalf of our team" works, while "On behalf of myself" fails.
    behalf comes from bi-halve, on the part of (i.e., my family), as a representative for (i.e., my family).

    On behalf of my family (I am representing my family's thoughts and wishes by saying) I would like to invite you to dinner.

    On behalf of my family and me (I am representing my family's thoughts and wishes, as well as my own, when I say) I would like to invite you to dinner.

  5. #5
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    637
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If your family just has one person - you yourself, could you say "On behalf of me"?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHope
    If your family just has one person - you yourself, could you say "On behalf of me"?
    Uhm, behalf comes from bihalves, bi- meaning two parties, two people, two groups. As one person, using 'on behalf' sounds like you've two personalities.

  7. #7
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    637
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hmm...so...Casiopea, it seems that the topic was so difficult to be conveyed.

    Now look at this case:

    There was a problem between A firm and B firm. And they blamed on each other. Mr. John is of A firm, and he had an idea that his firm thought the idea might solve the problem. But they didn't want to take responsibility should the idea failed. So they decided that Mr. John went to B firm to tell them the idea. Of course Mr.John could not say "On behalf of my company", or else, the A firm had to take the responsibility if the idea failed. In the reception room of the B firm, Mr John told the idea to the members of the B firm, saying"I tell his idea to you, just on behalf of me myself, not my company..."

    Got the picture? If the idea finally failed, the B firm would want Mr John to take the responsibility. Okay, Mr John would like to take it. Because the A firm has secrectly promised him to compensate anything he lost if the idea failed. Because Mr. John's "great courage" made the A firm's reputation safe.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There was a problem between firm A and firm B, and both firms blamed each other. Firm A had an idea on how to solve the problem, but they didn't want to take responsibility should the idea fail, so as a tactic they sent Mr. Johnson to B firm to tell them the idea. Mr. Johnson was told to tell firm B that the idea was his and his alone, that it wasn't his firm's idea. When Mr. Johnson arrived at firm B he said, "I'm telling you this on behalf of me/myself, not on behalf of my company."

    It's still sound awkward to me. Sorry. In that context it means, On my own behalf (i.e., I'm doing this for me, to save myself/make myself look good/no one else will do it for me so I have to do it). It's all about "me". That meaing just doesn't fit the context in my opinion.

Similar Threads

  1. to/for question
    By mylene in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2004, 01:43

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •