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Thread: Kinds of verbs

  1. #1
    lucalita009's Avatar
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    Default Kinds of verbs

    Hi, teachers
    Could you tell me how many kinds of verbs? And what are they?
    Thank you very much

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by lucalita009 View Post
    Hi, teachers
    Could you tell me how many kinds of verbs? And what are they?
    Thank you very much
    There's any number of kinds of verbs, depending on what you want to use as a criterion to differentiate them.
    For example verbs can be finite or non-finite; they can be transitive or intransitive; in active or passive form. You can have auxiliary verbs, modal verbs; regular verbs or irregular verbs; main verbs, helping verbs.
    But these are all classifications which sometimes just divide all verbs into two kinds by different criteria.
    What do you really want to know?

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    There's any number of kinds of verbs, depending on what you want to use as a criterion to differentiate them.
    For example verbs can be finite or non-finite; they can be transitive or intransitive; in active or passive form. You can have auxiliary verbs, modal verbs; regular verbs or irregular verbs; main verbs, helping verbs.
    But these are all classifications which sometimes just divide all verbs into two kinds by different criteria.
    What do you really want to know?
    Thank u very much, Raymott
    I want to know about Sense Verbs. Could u give me their definition and some examples? How can i use it? I really have trouble with it.

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by lucalita009 View Post
    Thank u very much, Raymott
    I want to know about Sense Verbs. Could u give me their definition and some examples? How can i use it? I really have trouble with it.
    only briefly, the two basic divisions are auxiliary (incl. modal) verbs and lexical verbs. Sense verbs are such as hera, see, taste, feel...

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    only briefly, the two basic divisions are auxiliary (incl. modal) verbs and lexical verbs. Sense verbs are such as hera, see, taste, feel...
    Ok. What about using sense verbs?

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by lucalita009 View Post
    Ok. What about using sense verbs?
    they act like normal lexical verbs but they do attract bare infinitives (infinive without the particle "to") or gerunds. Examples:

    I saw him come.
    I saw him coming.

    Anything else?

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    they act like normal lexical verbs but they do attract bare infinitives (infinive without the particle "to") or gerunds. Examples:

    I saw him come.
    I saw him coming.

    Anything else?
    Is there any difference between "come" and "coming"?
    I have read in some materials that Sense verbs are followed by an Adjective, and the adjective modifies it. Is it right?

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by lucalita009 View Post
    Is there any difference between "come" and "coming"?
    I have read in some materials that Sense verbs are followed by an Adjective, and the adjective modifies it. Is it right?
    The difference is minor although in some contexts may be a lot substantial.

    I saw him come - I saw him when he came - a single-shot action that was already completed.

    I saw hime coming - I saw him when he was coming. This emphasize the fact you saw his movement of coming, if you want...

    Sense verbs (feel, see, hear, taste, etc.) along with others (look, seem, ...) are followed by adjective rather than adverbs. Thats the thing. It tastes good. Not:It tastes well. I look perferct. Not: I look perfectly. In colloquial utterance you can find some exceptions, though (I feel perfectly well, etc.).

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    The difference is minor although in some contexts may be a lot substantial.

    I saw him come - I saw him when he came - a single-shot action that was already completed.

    I saw hime coming - I saw him when he was coming. This emphasize the fact you saw his movement of coming, if you want...

    Sense verbs (feel, see, hear, taste, etc.) along with others (look, seem, ...) are followed by adjective rather than adverbs. Thats the thing. It tastes good. Not:It tastes well. I look perferct. Not: I look perfectly. In colloquial utterance you can find some exceptions, though (I feel perfectly well, etc.).
    Thank you very much, jirikoo.
    Your answer is really helpful to me.

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    Default Re: Kinds of verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    Sense verbs (feel, see, hear, taste, etc.) along with others (look, seem, ...) are followed by adjective rather than adverbs. Thats the thing. It tastes good. Not:It tastes well. I look perferct. Not: I look perfectly. In colloquial utterance you can find some exceptions, though (I feel perfectly well, etc.).
    Isn't there a difference between saying: "It tastes good." or"It looks perfect" and "I feel perfectly well" ? In the first type you describe the Subject "it", give some characteristics of the subject, not the verb therefore it is adj. not adv.

    "I feel perfectly well" - if you focus on the action - you may feel well, but not be fine.

    awaiting experts' comments

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