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    #1

    What are the differences? (1)

    1) You repay a loan or you pay a loan?
    2) What is the difference between stroke and rub?
    3) Do you have any words that means pinch but in a more gentle phrase?
    5) What are the differences between pebble and gravel and shingle and cobble?


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    #2

    Re: What are the differences? (1)

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    1) You repay a loan or you pay a loan?
    2) What is the difference between stroke and rub?
    3) Do you have any words that means pinch but in a more gentle phrase?
    5) What are the differences between pebble and gravel and shingle and cobble?
    You have borrowed money which you repay to the lender

    Stroke the cat = lightly pass your hand over its fur; Rub the cat = pass your hand over it using pressure.

    No

    Have you looked these words up?


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    #3

    Re: What are the differences? (1)

    Hi,
    2) So what if I stroke my lover's body and rub her hair?
    3) In a more specific context, say, you have a beautiful baby at home and her face is so soft and nice that you want to ____ (same as pinch, any other words?)
    4) I did, but I don't know the context. Like, where do you see shingle, cobble, pebble, gravel? I have not the faintest idea. Lexicons are not that long


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    #4

    Re: What are the differences? (1)

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Hi,
    2) So what if I stroke my lover's body and rub her hair? She might enjoy it and she might not unless you are drying her hair, I would advise against rubbing it.
    3) In a more specific context, say, you have a beautiful baby at home and her face is so soft and nice that you want to ____ (same as pinch, any other words?) I still cannot think of an alternative. A pinch can be gentle or harsh.
    4) I did, but I don't know the context. Like, where do you see shingle, cobble, pebble, gravel? I have not the faintest idea. Lexicons are not that long
    Shingle = small stones in a beach, usually at the sea but can also be by rivers
    Cobble = a rounded stone used in the making of a road or pavement, traditionally just big enough to fit into a man's mouth OR a geologic term for a rock or rock fragment with a particle size between 64–256 mm (2.5–10 inches.} This is an image of a cobbled path: Google Image Result for http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~iany/patterns/images/cobbled_path.jpg
    Pebble = a small, usually rounded, stone
    Gravel = a loose mixture of small stones and coarse sand, used for paths and roads.

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    #5

    Re: What are the differences? (1)

    And beware, since you're in America: "rocks" are much smaller in America than they are over here. In the US, you might call a pebble a rock (and a 'pet-rock' was a handy size - Pet Rock Page). But in Br English a rock is much bigger - weighing at least a kilo, sometimes 100s.

    b

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