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Thread: Absolute Clause

  1. #1
    rajan is offline Member
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    Default Absolute Clause

    Dear all,

    Whetehr the following unlined part is Absloute Clause or noun clause (may be) ? Also what is the meaning of "As" in the sentence.

    As the death toll from the serial blasts, now counted at 19, crept up to 49, Ahmedabad woke up to an edgy start on Sunday with police defusing an exploded bombat at .............., where the first terror bomb had gone off.

    Regards

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    I'd say it is an adverbial clause.

  3. #3
    rajan is offline Member
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    Thanks for your response.

    I would like to ask why it can not be a absolute clause.

    Whats the meaing of as here

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    I'd say it is an adverbial clause.

  4. #4
    philipwei is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    I think as means when here.

    It cannot be an absolute clause (I would say absolute construction) because it is a complete clause (with subject+verb). An absolute construction would be like this:
    With the death toll from the serial blasts, now counted at 19, creeping up to 49, Ahmedabad woke up to an edgy start on Sunday with police defusing an exploded bombat at .............., where the first terror bomb had gone off.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    ABSOLUTE CLAUSE
    An adverbial clause has its own subject and a participle as its verb or no verb at all:
    The dinner having been prepared, I had time to take a nap before the guests arrived.
    Here, the verb is the participle phrase having been prepared and the subject is the dinner. Contrast the adverbial participle clause in Having prepared the dinner, I had time to take a nap, where the subject of having prepared the dinner is understood to be identical with the main subject I.
    I, having prepared the dinner, had time to take a nap.
    An absolute clause is not introduced by a subordinating conjunction: after having prepared the dinner and while preparing the dinner are not absolute clauses. The participle may end in -ing (trembling in His voice trembling, he described what had happened) or -ed (wasted in Their money wasted on imprudent schemes, they could not expect any further help).

    With some irregular verbs, the participle may not end in -ed: spent in Their money spent on imprudent schemes, they could expect no further help. Absolute clauses may be without a verb, as in The soldiers emerged from their hiding places, their hands high above their heads, a corresponding participle clause being their hands held high above their heads. (The end of the previous sentence itself contains an absolute clause with the participle being as its verb.)

    Outside a few set phrases such as all being/going well, weather permitting, present company excluded/excepted, absolute clauses are infrequent and usually confined to formal written English.

    Source Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language | Date: 1998 <cited>

  6. #6
    Clark is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    Is there such a thing as an Infinitive absolute construction?

    Soon you will have to stand on your feet without your mother or me to fuss over you.

  7. #7
    Soup's Avatar
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Is there such a thing as an Infinitive absolute construction?
    Absolute clause with active participle
    The deadline approaching, they panicked.

    Absolute clause with other predicate
    This done, Caesar crossed the Rubicon.

    Complement of P
    With Caesar to lead the army, victory is almost certain.
    With Caesar leading the army, victory is almost certain.
    With the project done, we can leave.

    Absolute infinitive
    This statute to remain in force.

    Infinitive for finite clause
    They declared that this statute to remain in force.

  8. #8
    rajan is offline Member
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    Would you please tell mewhat "P" means here?



    Complement of P
    With Caesar to lead the army, victory is almost certain.
    With Caesar leading the army, victory is almost certain.
    With the project done, we can leave.

    Absolute infinitive
    This statute to remain in force.

    Infinitive for finite clause
    They declared that this statute to remain in force.[/QUOTE]
    Last edited by rajan; 03-Aug-2008 at 09:10.

  9. #9
    Clark is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Absolute Clause

    Quote Originally Posted by rajan View Post
    Would you please tell mewhat "P" means here?
    Preposition

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