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    #1

    where ...is/where is...

    Hi

    I've been wondering why this should be: Guess where the stress is in them?
    Instead of: Guess where is the stress in them?


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    #2

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    The root question is:
    Where is the stress in them? ('is' before 'stress')

    When you express it as a 'reported speech', you say:
    Do you know where the stress is in them ('is' after 'stress')
    (not Do you know where is the stress in them?)

    or
    I don't know where the stress is in them.

    or
    Guess where the stress is in them.

    or
    You figure out where the stress is in them

    I'm not sure what topic in grammar this comes under, but this is how it works.

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  1. LeUyenHoc's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    When you express it as a 'reported speech',
    Hi,

    I think that is "indirect question" but not "reported speech".

    If that were a "reported speech", the form of "is" would be changed?

    Need more discussion.

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    #4

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    direct and indirect speech, reported speech, indirect question, whatever...I'm not a English teacher after all.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    I've been wondering why this should be: Guess where the stress is in them?
    Instead of: Guess where is the stress in them?

    It's elliptical for Can you guess where the stress is in them?

    Can (Aux)
    you (Subject)
    guess (verb)
    OBJECT
    where the stress (subject)
    is (verb)

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    #6

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    For indirect questions, you use the following structure:

    S1 + V1 + (O1) + [question words = wh or if(yes/no) or How] S2+ (auxiliaries) + V2 + O2.

    Ex1: I want to know if you are male or female.

    Are you male or female?

    EX2: I would like you to tell me where you are now.

    Where are you now?

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  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    The root question is:
    Where is the stress in them? ('is' before 'stress')
    This is all true. But I think the problem here is that "where" is being taken for a question word, whereas it's actually a subordinating conjunction.
    Put simply, it's a where clause.
    I'm going to where the sun is shining. Right
    I'm going to where is the sun shining. Wrong
    Guess where the sun is shining. Right.

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    #8

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    If that were a "reported speech", the form of "is" would be changed?
    Care to elaborate? Examples?

    I prefer to use logic rather than remember grammar rules.
    From direct to indirect, the order of the verb is reversed.
    Last edited by tedtmc; 03-Aug-2008 at 12:35.

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    #9

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    This is all true. But I think the problem here is that "where" is being taken for a question word, whereas it's actually a subordinating conjunction.
    Put simply, it's a where clause.
    I'm going to where the sun is shining. Right
    I'm going to where is the sun shining. Wrong
    Guess where the sun is shining. Right.
    I conclude then that my example: Guess where the stress is in them (it's not a question since there is no inversion? Right?)

    thanks

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: where ...is/where is...

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    I conclude then that my example: Guess where the stress is in them (it's not a question since there is no inversion? Right?)

    thanks
    Your example uses an imperative, "guess". It could be called an indirect question.
    But it doesn't matter. Here is a question with a "where-clause" with no word inversion.
    "Can you tell me where the stress is in this sentence?" Right.
    "Can you tell me: Where is the stress in this sentence?" Right.

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