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Thread: Past of "wind"

  1. #1
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Past of "wind"

    I've been asked (why me? - but it's an interesting question) -

    Plz Bob, I am having difficultty finding the past tense of the verb 'wind' ? Plz help me ! will wait for your reply!!!

    It depends which of the two homographs (Search Results for 'homograph' - UsingEnglish.com) you mean - /wınd/ or /waınd/ (both verbs). The simple past of the first is "winded": The fall only winded him; the simple past of the second is "wound": The gardener wound the hose onto the reel.

    But be careful with "wound" - it's another homograph: /waɷnd/, not /wu:nd/. So: The path wound up to the top of the hill; and when he reached the top, he fell back down. But he was only winded, not wounded. In this example the 3 w-words are pronounced /waɷnd/, /'wındıd/ and /'wu:ndıd/ (!)

    (This is probably more than the original questioner wanted to know, but it's how I would have answered if the question had been posted in the forum.)

    b

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Past of "wind"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I've been asked (why me? - but it's an interesting question) -

    Plz Bob, I am having difficultty finding the past tense of the verb 'wind' ? Plz help me ! will wait for your reply!!!

    It depends which of the two homographs (Search Results for 'homograph' - UsingEnglish.com) you mean - /wınd/ or /waınd/ (both verbs). The simple past of the first is "winded": The fall only winded him; the simple past of the second is "wound": The gardener wound the hose onto the reel.

    But be careful with "wound" - it's another homograph: /waɷnd/, not /wu:nd/. So: The path wound up to the top of the hill; and when he reached the top, he fell back down. But he was only winded, not wounded. In this example the 3 w-words are pronounced /waɷnd/, /'wındıd/ and /'wu:ndıd/ (!)

    (This is probably more than the original questioner wanted to know, but it's how I would have answered if the question had been posted in the forum.)

    b
    Answered twice on his posted questions in this forum. He seems to have been wound up about it!

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Past of "wind"

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Answered twice on his posted questions in this forum. He seems to have been wound up about it!
    ... not to mention similar questions on various people's message boards. Where will the forum wind up if this goes on?!

    b

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