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  1. #1
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    Default resulting copula

    Hello,

    As a resulting copula, GET is often equivalent to BECOME, which is used to express gradual change, often enhanced by modification with more and more, increasingly,etc. >>
    Here are some examples,
    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.
    (2) Our technique is getting increasingly specialized.
    Can you see any difference?

    (3) It's getting dark.
    (4) It's becoming dark.
    (5) The teacher's getting angry.
    (6) the teacher's becoming angry.
    Can you tell me if there is a tinge of nuance in meaning?


    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: resulting copula

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Hello,

    As a resulting copula, GET is often equivalent to BECOME, which is used to express gradual change, often enhanced by modification with more and more, increasingly,etc. >>
    Here are some examples,
    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.
    (2) Our technique is getting increasingly specialized.
    Can you see any difference?

    (3) It's getting dark.
    (4) It's becoming dark.
    (5) The teacher's getting angry.
    (6) the teacher's becoming angry.
    Can you tell me if there is a tinge of nuance in meaning?


    Thanks.
    Yes. They are synonyms there. You might be able to see the similarity if you use "starting to get", like this,

    It's starting to get dark ~ It's getting dark.
    The teacher is starting to get angry ~ The teacher is getting angry.

    All the best, :D

  3. #3
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    Default

    As a resulting copula, GET is often equivalent to BECOME, which is used to express gradual change, often enhanced by modification with more and more, increasingly,etc. >>
    Here are some examples,
    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.

    Cas, I understand what you said.
    I have another question that comes in mind. Since 'get' and 'become' are somewhat equivalent in the meaning in my examples, would you think using 'increasingly' or 'more and more' with 'get' or 'become' a bit redundant?

    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.
    (2) Our technique is becoming specialized. (Any better?)


  4. #4
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    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    As a resulting copula, GET is often equivalent to BECOME, which is used to express gradual change, often enhanced by modification with more and more, increasingly,etc. >>
    Here are some examples,
    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.

    Cas, I understand what you said.
    I have another question that comes in mind. Since 'get' and 'become' are somewhat equivalent in the meaning in my examples, would you think using 'increasingly' or 'more and more' with 'get' or 'become' a bit redundant?

    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.
    (2) Our technique is becoming specialized. (Any better?)


    I would not say that "increasingly" is redundant.

    If "our technique" is already specialized, it can become more specialized. We can use "increasingly" to express this. "more and more specialized"

    See "increasingly" at the bottom of this page: http://dictionary.reference.com/sear...q=increasingly

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    As a resulting copula, GET is often equivalent to BECOME, which is used to express gradual change, often enhanced by modification with more and more, increasingly,etc. >>
    Here are some examples,
    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.

    Cas, I understand what you said.
    I have another question that comes in mind. Since 'get' and 'become' are somewhat equivalent in the meaning in my examples, would you think using 'increasingly' or 'more and more' with 'get' or 'become' a bit redundant?

    (1) Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.
    (2) Our technique is becoming specialized. (Any better?)


    I would not say that "increasingly" is redundant.

    If "our technique" is already specialized, it can become more specialized. We can use "increasingly" to express this. "more and more specialized"

    See "increasingly" at the bottom of this page: http://dictionary.reference.com/sear...q=increasingly

    Compare:
    (1)She became increasingly depressed.
    --> It looks fine if the main verb appeared in a from of past tense. Since the past tense implies the completed action, here it is the completion of change, I think it makes sense to use 'increasingly' to modify her depression.'

    (2)She's becoming increasingly depressed.
    --> But when I look at this sentence, I would think that she's in the process of changing her mood. Since the progressive from is used here to indicate the on-going action, I would think it is somewhat "dragging". Here comes the confusion: does the adverb "increasingly" modify "becoming"? Or "depressed"? This is why I think "Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized" is bit roundabout.

    :wink:

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Here comes the confusion: does the adverb "increasingly" modify "becoming"? Or "depressed"? This is why I think "Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized" is bit roundabout.
    Here's a way to tell: move the adverb. :D

    1. She is becoming increasingly depressed.
    2. She is increasingly becoming depressed.

    In 1. 'increasingly' modifies the adjective 'depressed'. It means, her state of depression is increasing. That is, she is becoming depressed more and more. In 2., 'increasingly' modifies the verb phrase 'becoming depressed'. It means, the cycle of her depression is more frequent. That is, she's becoming depressed more often. Maybe she used to get depressed once a month, and now she's getting depressed three times a month.

    In 3., below, 'the technique' is becoming more and more specialized.

    3. Our technique is becoming increasingly specialized.

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