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Thread: I have lunched

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    #1

    I have lunched

    I heard my seven-year-old son , who is learning English as his second languge, saying " I have just lunched"
    He means he has just had his lunch. My question is: Can lunch be used as a verb as well as a noun?


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    #2

    Re: I have lunched

    It is a recognised verb.

    Ladies who lunch are sometimes busy professional women.
    We lunched at the Hilton yesterday.

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    #3

    Re: I have lunched

    Yes it is possible to use Lunch as a verb, e.g.
    # I am lunching with Rafiq.

    This is usually used when you have lunch formally in a returant with a guest.
    # I will be lunching with a client.

    Do you know that the verb "GO" is used as a noun?

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    #4

    Re: I have lunched

    Quote Originally Posted by hamoodee View Post
    I heard my seven-year-old son , who is learning English as his second languge, saying " I have just lunched"
    He means he has just had his lunch. My question is: Can lunch be used as a verb as well as a noun?
    As others have said, "lunch" can be a verb. But it is usually a verb in the context of adult society. So I would guess that this 7-yr-old was making a 'mistake' (using the verb in an inappropriate context), but just happening - accidentally - to use a possible verb. He was also, as native speakers do, creating a verb out of a known noun. More or less any noun, as they say, can be verbed.

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    #5

    Thumbs up Re: I have lunched

    Thanks a lot for the great information that you provided for me.
    Quote Originally Posted by mfhaq77 View Post
    Do you know that the verb "GO" is used as a noun?
    Yes , but in diffrent meaning . I read or heard a sentence " You can not eat an elephant in one go ."


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    #6

    Re: I have lunched

    Quote Originally Posted by mfhaq77 View Post
    Do you know that the verb "GO" is used as a noun?
    Well, I was curious about this myself. So I checked out dictionary.com and found these examples of 'go' being used as a noun:

    47.the act of going: the come and go of the seasons.
    48.
    energy, spirit, or animation: a man with a lot of go.
    49.
    a try at something; attempt: to have a go at winning the prize.
    50.
    a successful accomplishment; success: to make a go of a new business.
    51.Informal. a business agreement; deal; bargain: Thirty dollars? It's a go.
    52.
    Informal. approval or permission, as to undertake or begin something: The boss gave us the go on the new project.
    53.
    Boxing. a bout: the main go.

    Hope this helps.

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