Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: stay tuned=?

  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,790
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile stay tuned=?

    A TV newsman often says 'stay tuned' before an interval in his news broadcast.

    I am wondering what the exact meaning is. I suppose it means stay here, don't go away or change to another channel and we'll come back soon. The phrase probably origins from the radio.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: stay tuned=?

    You are correct, the phrase dates back to the days of early radio (when it was still referred to as the "wireless.") It often took some delicate maneuvering with the radio dial to receive a station clearly, without static or background noise. This procedure was referred to as "tuning in." If you were to switch stations, it took a good few minutes to tune into the new station properly. So to discourage listeners from changing the station, radio announcers would advise them to "stay tuned" and back up their plea by promising interesting stories and programming after the station break.

    In the early days of television, TV sets had a set of "rabbit ears" antennae on top, and whenever you chose a station, you had to shift the antennae this way and that to get optimum reception. Likewise, you had to adjust the "fine tuning" dial, as well as the horizontal and vertical hold. Today, of course, most televisions have automatic, electronic tuning and all you have to do to change a channel is push a button and you get a perfect picture every time. But the phrase "stay tuned" has remained in the broadcast vernacular.

    (Likewise, some announcers will still warn viewers "don't touch that dial!" meaning don't change the channel. This dates back to when TV sets had rotary dials that were used to change channels. Dials have since gone the way of the dinosaur, but sometimes that phrase is still used.)

  3. #3
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,790
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: stay tuned=?

    Hello Ouisch,

    Thank you very much for the informative answer. I got it.

    Have a good day!

Similar Threads

  1. stay and stand
    By Tvita in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Apr-2008, 10:02
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Nov-2007, 07:59
  3. If you stay around
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Oct-2007, 03:02
  4. stay clam and not panic
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2005, 18:05
  5. "stay at home" and "stay home"?
    By simile in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 10-Sep-2003, 17:25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk