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  1. #1
    poet is offline Newbie
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    Default Letter to my friend.

    Hi all,

    Can someone check and correct this letter please. In order to get a more usual construction in English.

    Thanks in advance,

    poet.


    I would like to use this letter as an opportunity to share with you my music tastes as well as my readings. Perhaps you are not very familiar with the French music scene. You may or may not have already heard about our French icon Serge Gainsbourg. Best known for his most legendary provocative erotic-pop song “Je t’aime... moi non plus” (I love you... nor do I) that would achieve great international success in 1969. Certain people say that he was a poet to French song as Bob Dylan is to American song, even though both of them are quite different artistically, there again... “Histoire de Melody Nelson”, originally released in 1971, is now considered by many of his British and Francophone admirers to be his finest work. Certainly with the combination of its sublime orchestral arrangements and musical richness. This concept album, which is a warm tribute to Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, relates a passionate and tragic affair between a middle-aged man and a 15 years old red-headed young girl. Serge Gainsbourg also has well explored later another musical genre. Mellow reggae’s rhythm would actually be for him the perfect harmony for his talking voice and the subtle but sophisticated sensuality of his poetry. Thus, he traveled to Jamaica in 1979 and recorded in Kingston, with Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare – the greatest reggae rhythm section –, one of his most mesmerizing and memorable work. He offers us there a fresh but controversial interpretation of the French national anthem “La Marseillaise”, renamed for the occasion “Aux Armes et Cætera”, which inspired the eponymous title of this album. To finish off with French music, let me tell you more about Noir Désir. It is to them that i owe my fervent and sincere passion for The Gun Club for years. Jeffrey clearly has had a massive influence on them, especially on the lead singer Bertrand, who greatly admires him. I am referring of course, to the man that Jeffrey was and not only the musician. They met a couple of times in the South of France and they hit it off. When Bertrand learnt the sudden passing of Jeffrey, he composed straightaway a memorial song – just him playing his acoustic guitar and singing – simply called “Song for JLP”. This powerful song is the sound of an intense rolling wave of emotion deeply felt after the loss of a significant soul. This probably remains one of the most profoundly moving eulogies dedicated to Jeffrey to date. Your brother also was an avid reader, and I’m sure that you have great interest in literature too. Therefore, I’m so glad to introduce you to Antonin Artaud. At a starting point, you should know that others authors, except for a very few audacious writers, are quite insipid, and they easily fall short in comparison with Antonin Artaud’s outstanding writing talents. He was a french poet, essayist, actor, playwright, visionary and even so, a marginal figure in his lifetime. His name is closely connected with a major revolt against lack of authenticity in language and in the act of writing itself. He suffered, among others, from neuralgia due to meningitis after-effects which gave him a nervous temperament. Artaud then experienced lifelong addiction to opiates to relieve that pain and the increasing additional symptoms caused by that illness. That disease is originally behind the duality of his relentless inner struggle between the physical pain he endured his whole life through and his creativity that he compared to a fundamental alienation from his emotions. His obsessive goal was to change the traditional Western theater from an entertaining and commercial orientation performance to a true communion between actors and audience. He also made a journey to Mexico in search of forgotten civilizations to study primitive societies and their occult practices from which he cultivated a serious interest in, for the purpose of entirely exploring the mystical side to his personality. From that time on, and since his return voyage, Artaud became increasingly odd and his extreme behaviour inevitably led him to various mental hospitals, in which he would be confined for nine years. Psychiatrists would try in vain to remove his poetic nature by subjecting him electroshock treatments causing many states of coma. Yet, his work would be, at that time, even greater than ever before. Unfortunately, Antonin Artaud died shortly after his release of cancer in 1948, due to acts of ill-treatment against him throughout his confinement. Well, i tried here to share a lot of my deepest feelings with you in such a way so as to being open and showing my inner self to you verbally, just as thesepresents i give you which are heartfelt ways to invite you to come into the sphere of my serious interests. I hope you will enjoy them with a great pleasure.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Letter to my friend.

    First observation - break it up into paragraphs.

  3. #3
    poet is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
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      • Current Location:
      • France
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    Default Re: Letter to my friend.

    Dear Anglika,

    I have just took more care with the presentation of my letter, hopefully that someone would check it and correct it now.


    I would like to use this letter as an opportunity to share with you my music tastes as well as my readings. Perhaps you are not very familiar with the French music scene. You may or may not have already heard about our French icon Serge Gainsbourg. Best known for his most legendary provocative erotic-pop song “ Je t'aime... moi non plus” (I love you... nor do I) that would achieve great international success in 1969. Certain people say that he was a poet to French song as Bob Dylan is to American song, even though both are quite different artistically, then again... “ Histoire de Melody Nelson”, originally released in 1971, is now considered by many of his British and Francophone admirers to be his finest work. Certainly with the combination of its sublime orchestral arrangements and musical richness. This concept album is a warm tribute to Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita that relates a passionate and tragic affair between a middle-aged man and a 15 years old red-headed young girl. Serge Gainsbourg also has well explored later another musical genre. The Mellow reggae mood would actually be for him at that moment the perfect harmony for his talking voice and the subtle but sophisticated sensuality of his poetry. Thus, he traveled to Jamaica in 1979 and recorded in Kingston, with Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare – the greatest reggae rhythm section –, one of his most mesmerizing and memorable work. He offers us there a fresh but controversial interpretation of the French national anthem “La Marseillaise”, renamed for the occasion “Aux Armes et Cætera”, which inspired the eponymous title of this album.

    To finish off with French music, let me tell you more about Noir Désir. It is to them that i owe my fervent and sincere passion for The Gun Club for years. Jeffrey clearly has had a massive influence on them, especially on the lead singer Bertrand, who greatly admires him. I am referring of course, to the man that Jeffrey was and not only the musician. They met a couple of times in the South of France and they hit it off. When Bertrand learnt the sudden passing of Jeffrey, he composed straightaway a memorial song – just him playing his acoustic guitar and singing – simply called “Song for JLP”. This powerful song is the sound of an intense rolling wave of emotion deeply felt after the loss of a significant soul. This probably remains one of the most profoundly moving eulogies dedicated to Jeffrey to date.


    Your brother also was an avid reader, and I'm sure that you have great interest in literature too. Therefore, I'm so glad to introduce you to Antonin Artaud. At a starting point, you should know that others authors, except for a very few audacious writers, are quite insipid, and they easily fall short in comparison with Antonin Artaud's outstanding writing talents. He was a french poet, essayist, actor, playwright, visionary and even so, a marginal figure in his lifetime. His name is closely connected with a major revolt against lack of authenticity in language and in the act of writing itself. He suffered, among others, from neuralgia due to meningitis after-effects which gave him a nervous temperament. Artaud then experienced lifelong addiction to opiates to relieve that pain and the increasing additional symptoms caused by that illness. That disease is originally behind the duality of his relentless inner struggle between the physical pain he endured his whole life through and his creativity that he compared to a fundamental alienation from his emotions. His obsessive goal was to change the traditional Western theater from an entertaining and commercial orientation performance to a true communion between actors and audience. He also made a journey to Mexico in search of forgotten civilizations to study primitive societies and their occult practices from which he cultivated a serious interest in, for the purpose of exploring the mystical side to his personality. From that time, and since his return voyage, Artaud became increasingly odd and his extreme behaviour inevitably led him to captivity in various mental hospitals for nine years. Psychiatrists would try in vain to remove his poetic nature by subjecting him electroshock treatments causing many states of coma. Yet, his work would be, at that time, even greater than ever before. Antonin Artaud died shortly after his release of cancer, due to acts of ill-treatment against him throughout his confinement. Well, i tried here to share a lot of my deepest feelings with you in such a way so as to being open and showing my inner self to you verbally, just as these presents i give you which are heartfelt ways to invite you to come into my world. I hope you will enjoy them with a great pleasure.



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