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  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Smile The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Crows / ravens always presents a sinister image and ominous symbol , such as death, misfortune and loneliness, in traditional Chinese culture from movies to novels.

    I am wondering whether it is similar in the West? I think it means that. And that is why Poe choose a raven rather than other kinds of birds in his poem—The Raven? Am I right?

    By the way, I knew Jim Crow is a derogatory term in English for the black.

    Thanks in advance!

    PS:
    Here’s the URL link with the online version of The Raven.

    Edgar Allan Poe: The Raven
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 11-Aug-2008 at 12:13.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    The Poe Decoder - "The Raven" for a discussion of the poem.

    Ravens carry many symbolic associations: death, knowledge, good fortune, bad fortune.

    They were the familiars of Odin, the Norse chief god, bringing him news of what was happening in the world. As scavengers, they are linked to death. In England, there is a belief that so long as there are ravens in the Tower of London, the country is safe.

  3. #3
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Smile Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Anglika, thank you very much for your answer.

  4. #4
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    Smile Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    . In England, there is a belief that so long as there are ravens in the Tower of London, the country is safe.
    From BBC China:

    There is a legend that says, should the ravens leave the Tower of London, the tower will collapse, the monarchy will disappear, and a great disaster will befall the nation.
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 19-Aug-2008 at 01:49. Reason: removed eye-rolling icon

  5. #5
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Exactly.

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    Default Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    There is also the question that there are so few birds who can "talk".

    A raven is one such bird. E.A. Poe's raven has learned only one word: Nevermore.

    And being a bird which is known to be associated with knowledge, the student asks it all those questions which trouble his mind.

    And the raven answers - Nevermore.

    And finally, a black bird makes such a striking contrast whilst set against a white marble bust.
    Last edited by Rebel; 18-Aug-2008 at 06:51.

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    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Smile Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Hi Rebel,

    Thank you for your interpretation.

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    Default Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    It's a favourite poem of mine, by the way!

  9. #9
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    Smile Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    It's a favourite poem of mine, by the way!
    Hi Rebel,

    Could you tell me why it is a favourite poem of yours at your convenience?

    Here's my thought about this poem.

    The protagonist seemed to desperately despair after losing his girl. He lonely constrained himself in his one-man world, through talking to a raven, virtually he spoke to himself. The raven couldn't really speak but monotonously crowed, the chant of 'nevermore' was just the protagonist inward voice. He just talked to himself and tried to convinced himself that everything was over-'nevermore', because his world collapsed after losing his girl.

    From the midnight to the raven, the key colour of the poem is black, often concidered as death, conveyed the hopeless spiritual world of the protagonist. Though the conception is of novelty, it makes me feel a bit of hair-raising, and quite depressed.

    I learned another poem, Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Dylan Thomas. Though its theme is about death, I just feel more love than death.

    PS: Online version of Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night

    [minstrels] Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night -- Dylan Thomas

  10. #10
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    Default Re: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

    Because it expresses so well the desperation of a tortured mind and soul.

    First smiling at the strange apparition of the bird, then making fun at its unwordly countenance, then gradually falling into desperation again until he finally asks the raven the question that is most important to him.

    And that will sink him into a pit of black desperation as soon as he hears the answer.

    But still, he asks it.
    Last edited by Rebel; 19-Aug-2008 at 06:58.

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