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Thread: canceled

  1. #21
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    I believe he meant he has not resigned and has not been fired either. He has been working there for five years.
    I don't think he's a contractor (from what I've understood).

    FRC

  2. #22
    Natalie27 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    I believe he meant he has not resigned and has not been fired either. He has been working there for five years.
    I don't think he's a contractor (from what I've understood).

    FRC
    A contractor is someone hired in a construction business but nevertheless I understand what you are saying. To work by contract basically means that both parties have an agreement and the employee accepts the terms of the agreement ...duration of employment, amount of hours, pay, benefits, etc...
    In Dany's case I think this is what he is talking about - in other words he is set for 5 years and the employer cannot replace him or change the terms of what they had agreed upon originally.

  3. #23
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    Re:
    • not under notice


    Still under contract?
    The person is under contract and hasn't been informed that he is going to be dismissed?


  4. #24
    Natalie27 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Re:
    • not under notice


    Still under contract?
    The person is under contract and hasn't been informed that he is going to be dismissed?

    well, we are back to square one...what in God's name is "not under notice"?
    From Dany's reply and 1000 posts later I think he meant "under contract".

    If we are right about this, he cann't be dismissed (or as Dany puts it "canceled") because he was assigned to this position for the term of 5 years.

    Unless there is another term in English for "under notice" that I am not familiar with.

  5. #25
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    I think he means he didn't give in his notice. I didn't know 'contractor' applies only for construction business -- I've often said that I work as a freelance contractor
    Even if you sign for 5 years, your employer or you usually can break the contract if you let the other know some time before (often 3 months in the IT business in France).

    FRC

  6. #26
    Natalie27 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    I think he means he didn't give in his notice. I didn't know 'contractor' applies only for construction business -- I've often said that I work as a freelance contractor
    Even if you sign for 5 years, your employer or you usually can break the contract if you let the other know some time before (often 3 months in the IT business in France).

    FRC
    The only "contractor" I am familiar with is the one that is hired out by a company to provide goods or services or both. A contractor usually makes a living by contracting out jobs with bigger firms or private individuals. He is the one that will supply materials at a specified price... especially for construction work.
    That's as far as I know. Does anyone else here know of other contractors that I haven't heard of...?

  7. #27
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Couldn't you say 'with no notice requirement'?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Re:
    • not under notice


    Still under contract?
    The person is under contract and hasn't been informed that he is going to be dismissed?

    Yes... that works!

    This thread reminds me of the three blind men and the elephant.

  9. #29
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Viewed from the elephant's perspective.

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