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  1. #1
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    Is this an indirect question?

    hello


    1. When writing an indirect question, the introductory phrase is followed by the question itself in positive sentence structure ( subject + verb + object + adverbs ). Text claims that the following sentence is indirect question, but from my understanding it doesn’t have positive sentence structure, since instead of subject the verb comes first:

    ‘I wonder who helped him escape’

    The above can’t be indirect question since it doesn’t have positive sentence structure and yet the text claims it is




    2. Are both answers correct:

    ‘Is this your coat?’

    ‘I have no idea whose coat it is.’
    ‘I have no idea whose it is.’




    3. Why does go in past particle have two forms, gone and been ?


    thank you

  2. #2
    tzfujimino's Avatar
    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
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    Re: Is this an indirect question?

    Quote Originally Posted by newtothis View Post
    hello


    1. When writing an indirect question, the introductory phrase is followed by the question itself in positive sentence structure ( subject + verb + object + adverbs ). Text claims that the following sentence is indirect question, but from my understanding it doesn’t have positive sentence structure, since instead of subject the verb comes first:

    ‘I wonder who helped him escape’

    The above can’t be indirect question since it doesn’t have positive sentence structure and yet the text claims it is




    2. Are both answers correct:

    ‘Is this your coat?’

    ‘I have no idea whose coat it is.’
    ‘I have no idea whose it is.’




    3. Why does go in past particle have two forms, gone and been ?


    thank you
    Hi, newtothis!

    1. In my humble opinion, 'who' functions as a subject.
    2. Yes, I believe they are both correct.
    3. The past participle of 'go' is 'gone'. 'been' is the past participle of 'be'.
    I know what you mean, though. 'been' as in 'have been to' means like...'go'.

    I'm not a native speaker of English.
    Please wait for native speakers to respond to your query.

  3. #3
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Smile Re: Is this an indirect question?

    Quote Originally Posted by newtothis View Post
    ...
    3. Why does go in past particle have two forms, gone and been ?


    thank you
    The form been (to) refers to something that somebody has experienced through the action of going somewhere, and usually having returned from that place:
    I have been to Greece once in my life. = I went to Greece some time ago, and have returned.

    The other form gone (to) refers to the action of going somewhere, but not having returned from that place yet:
    She has gone to Greece. = she is on her way to Greece, or she may have reached there already; she's certainly not back from there yet.


  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: Is this an indirect question?

    [quote=tzfujimino;338363]

    1. In my humble opinion, 'who' functions as a subject.
    2. Yes, I believe they are both correct.


    The form been (to) refers to something that somebody has experienced through the action of going somewhere, and usually having returned from that place:
    I have been to Greece once in my life. = I went to Greece some time ago, and have returned.

    The other form gone (to) refers to the action of going somewhere, but not having returned from that place yet:
    She has gone to Greece. = she is on her way to Greece, or she may have reached there already; she's certainly not back from there yet. (quote) engee30

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