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Thread: Adding -ed


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    #1

    Adding -ed

    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. The casino is a license to print money.
    2. The casino is a licensed to print money.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Adding -ed

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. The casino is a license to print money. :D
    2. The casino is a licensed to print money. :(
    In 1., 'a license' is a noun phrase. In 2., 'licensed', a past participle' is modified by 'a', an article. Articles modify nouns, not adjectives.

    3. The casino is licensed to print money. :D (Passive)

  2. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #3
    Or 'the casino has a license to print money'. By the way, where is this place, Jack?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Micawber
    Or 'the casino has a license to print money'. By the way, where is this place, Jack?
    I kind of like the nominal predicate meaning:

    What's a casino?
    It's a license to print money.


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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Micawber
    Or 'the casino has a license to print money'. By the way, where is this place, Jack?
    It is in the movie, I think I was watching Walking Tall.

    Are these correct? Which one do I use?
    1. It is in the movie, I think I was watching Walking Tall.
    2. It was in the movie, I think I was watching Walking Tall. (This doesn't make sense right? Because 'was' is here and that means it is not in the movie anymore?

    In 1., 'a license' is a noun phrase. In 2., 'licensed', a past participle' is modified by 'a', an article. Articles modify nouns, not adjectives.
    3. This is a damaged car. (How do you know if this is not a noun?)
    4. This casino is a license to print money. (How do you know if this is not an adjective?)

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6
    [quote="jack"]
    Are these correct? Which one do I use?
    1. It is in the movie, I think I was watching Walking Tall. (OK)
    2. It was in the movie, I think I was watching Walking Tall. (OK)

    Senetence 1. refers to a general truth, whereas sentence 2. refers to the past--the time you were watching the movie.

    3. This is a damaged car. Noun?
    Nouns don't end in -ed. :wink:

    4. This casino is a license to print money. Adjective?)
    If it's preceded by a determiner (a/the) and followed by a noun, then it's an adjective:

    EX: a licenced establishment (Determiner+Adjective+Noun)

    If it's preceded by a determiner and not followed by a noun, then it's a noun:

    EX: a license to print money (Determiner+Noun+Infintive Phrase)


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    #7
    If it's preceded by a determiner and not followed by a noun, then it's a noun:
    EX: a license to print money (Determiner+Noun+Infintive Phrase)
    What do you mean by it's not followed by a noun?

    If it's preceded by a determiner (a/the) and followed by a noun, then it's an adjective:
    EX: a licenced establishment (Determiner+Adjective+Noun)
    What do you mean by it's followed by a noun? I see it is followed by an adjective.

    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. Her beauty is beyond compare.
    2. Her beauty is beyond compared. (Why is this wrong? This is not a to-be sentence?

    What do these mean?
    3. Imported cars.
    4. Import cars.
    5. Imported models.
    6. Import models.

  5. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #8
    Hi Jack,

    Let me just give Casiopea a little break here. The capitalized comments below are not shouting; I am just distinguishing my words from yours and Casiopea's:

    'If it's preceded by a determiner and not followed by a noun, then it's a noun:
    EX: a license to print money (Determiner+Noun+Infintive Phrase)'
    'What do you mean by it's not followed by a noun?'

    'LICENSE' HAS A DETERMINER BEFORE IT, BUT 'LICENSE' DOES NOT HAVE A NOUN AFTER IT-- THEREFORE IT IS A NOUN.


    'If it's preceded by a determiner (a/the) and followed by a noun, then it's an adjective:
    EX: a licenced establishment (Determiner+Adjective+Noun)'
    'What do you mean by it's followed by a noun? I see it is followed by an adjective?

    'LICENSED' ALSO HAS A DETERMINER BEFORE IT, BUT 'LICENSED' HAS A NOUN, 'ESTABLISHMENT', AFTER IT-- THEREFORE IT IS AN ADJECTIVE.'


    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. Her beauty is beyond compare.
    2. Her beauty is beyond compared. (Why is this wrong? This is not a to-be sentence?

    (1) IS CORRECT. 'COMPARE' IS A NOUN, THE OBJECT OF THE PREPOSITION 'BEYOND'. THE PHRASE IS A NOUN COMPLEMENT OF THE SUBJECT, 'HER BEAUTY. 'BE' IS A COPULATIVE VERB.

    (2) IS INCORRECT. ADJECTIVES CANNOT BE OBJECTS OF PREPOSITIONS.


    (3) through (6) 'IMPORT' IS A VERB WHICH HAS BECOME AN ADJECTIVE (PROBABLY VIA THE PHRASE 'IMPORT BUSINESS'); IT HAS THE SAME MEANING HERE AS 'IMPORTED'.

    HOPE THIS HELPS.

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9
    First, here's a trick you can use to help you decide if the word that comes after 'a' or 'the' is an adjective or a noun: Delete the word that comes after 'a' or 'the', like this,

    A. It's a license to make money => It's a to make money. (Not OK)
    B. It's a licenced restaurant => It's a restaurant. (OK)

    If the sentence sounds OK after you've deleted the word, then the word is an adjective (B.). If the sentence doesn't sound OK, then the word is a noun (A.). Nouns are required. Adjectives are not required. Adjectives function as added information, so if you delete them, the sentence will be OK.

    Second, as a rule, a preposition takes a noun as its object. Sentence 2. is not OK because 'beyond' is a preposition and 'compared' is an adjective. Notice the -ed ending on 'compared'. It is not a noun. :wink:

    1. Her beauty is beyond compare. (Preposition + Noun)
    2. Her beauty is beyond compared. (Preposition + Adjective)

    Lastly, 'imported' is an adjective and the -ed ending means, have been imported, whereas 'import', without the -ed, is a noun--it's short for the noun 'importation'--and it functions as an adjective in 4. and 6.

    3. imported cars :D Cars that have been imported
    4. import cars Importation cars
    5. imported models :D Models that have been imported
    6. import models Importation cars

    7. It's an import. (It's an importation)
    8. It's an import car. (It's an importation car)


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    #10
    Thank you very much for the detail information guys.

    What do these mean? Which one do I use?
    1. Thank you very much for the detail information guys.
    2. Thank you very much for the detailed information guys.

    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. Her beauty is beyond compare.
    2. Her beauty is beyond compared. (Why is this wrong? This is not a to-be sentence?

    (1) IS CORRECT. 'COMPARE' IS A NOUN, THE OBJECT OF THE PREPOSITION 'BEYOND'. THE PHRASE IS A NOUN COMPLEMENT OF THE SUBJECT, 'HER BEAUTY. 'BE' IS A COPULATIVE VERB.

    (2) IS INCORRECT. ADJECTIVES CANNOT BE OBJECTS OF PREPOSITIONS.
    I still don't really understand why is this wrong:
    3. Her beauty is beyond compared.
    But you can say this:
    4. This car is compared to this car and this car is better.

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