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  1. #1
    kiranlegend is offline Member
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    Default Nominative form vs Objective form

    Her ( not she), who had been the apple of his eye, he now began to regard with somwthing like distrust.

    Him( not he), who has always inspired in her a respect which almost overcame her affection, she now saw the object of open pleasantry.

    I copied the above two sentences from Wren and Martin Grammar book. I couldn't understand them at all

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    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Smile Re: Nominative form vs Objective form

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Her ( not she), who had been the apple of his eye, he now began to regard with somwthing like distrust.

    Him( not he), who has always inspired in her a respect which almost overcame her affection, she now saw the object of open pleasantry.

    I copied the above two sentences from Wren and Martin Grammar book. I couldn't understand them at all
    He now began to regard (whom?) her, who had been the apple of his eye, with something like distrust.

    She now saw (whom?) him, the object of open pleasantry, who has always inspired in her a respect which almost overcame her affection.


  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Nominative form vs Objective form

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Her ( not she), who had been the apple of his eye, he now began to regard with something like distrust.
    Although she had once been the apple of his eye, he now began to regard her with something like distrust.

    Him( not he), who had always inspired in her a respect which almost overcame her affection, she now saw the object of open pleasantry.
    Although he had always inspired in her a respect which almost overcame her affection, she now saw people openly making jokes about him. [This looks to me like a quote from Emma: Emma had always felt for Mr Knightley a respect that almost stopped her from falling in love with him. But Jane Austen was writing with all those inversions nearly 200 years ago.

    I copied the above two sentences from Wren and Martin Grammar book. I couldn't understand them at all
    No wonder! They're horribly contrived*. When was this grammar book written? And if the authors didn't attribute their source, shame on them! Why do writers of some grammar books have to pretend that normal users use language like this?

    b

    PS *I used this phrase before I realized where the examples came from; I assumed the writers of your grammar book had thought them up - as examples of contemporary English they seemed 'horribly contrived'. I fact, they were 'contrived' (in a good sense) by my favourite English novelist, and they are 'horrible' only in that they make life unnecessarily difficult for students when reproduced in the context of a teaching book.
    Last edited by BobK; 22-Aug-2008 at 23:14. Reason: PS added

  4. #4
    kiranlegend is offline Member
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    Default Re: Nominative form vs Objective form

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    No wonder! They're horribly contrived*. When was this grammar book written? And if the authors didn't attribute their source, shame on them! Why do writers of some grammar books have to pretend that normal users use language like this?

    b

    PS *I used this phrase before I realized where the examples came from; I assumed the writers of your grammar book had thought them up - as examples of contemporary English they seemed 'horribly contrived'. I fact, they were 'contrived' (in a good sense) by my favourite English novelist, and they are 'horrible' only in that they make life unnecessarily difficult for students when reproduced in the context of a teaching book.
    I just have seen the year in which it was written. It was first written in the year 1936, and my book was a revised edition published in 1989.

    they are 'horrible' only in that they make life unnecessarily difficult for students when reproduced in the context of a teaching book

    Even though I struggle understanding, Frankly, I love reading such intricate sentences:) The more I read and hear such kind, The more I develop interest and love toward English

    'I fact' = 'The fact' or 'I realised later'?

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Nominative form vs Objective form

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    I just have seen the year in which it was written. It was first written in the year 1936, and my book was a revised edition published in 1989.

    they are 'horrible' only in that they make life unnecessarily difficult for students when reproduced in the context of a teaching book

    Even though I struggle understanding, Frankly, I love reading such intricate sentences:) The more I read and hear such kind, The more I develop interest and love toward English

    'I fact' = 'The fact' or 'I realised later'?
    It was just a typo - I meant to write 'In fact'.

    And I know the way I write can be 'challenging' (to put it nicely)

    b

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