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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile Why just one eye?

    I am wondering why there is just one eye in the idiom of 'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder'? I mean why eye is in singular, normally, a person has two eyes.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 27-Aug-2008 at 07:42.

  2. Nain's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Why just one eye?

    You sure do have an eye for these kind of things.

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: Why just one eye?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nain View Post
    You sure do have an eye for these kind of things.
    Hi Nain,

    Thank you for your help. I SEE.

  4. NanetteDee's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: Why just one eye?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    I am wondering why there is just one eye in the idiom of 'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder'? I mean why eye is in singular, normally, a person has two eyes.

    Thanks!
    Interestingly, I was wondering about that too. There are more expressions that involve one eye only. For example, "To keep an eye on somebody, something." I have no the scientific explanation but what I think is that the "eye" is used figuratively as a definition of the close attention, of one's particular interest in the subject. Does it make sense?

    By the way, when I translated from Russian a poem by Sergey Yesenin (I am by no mean a professional), I tried and made a nonce-word based on the "one eye" idiom.

    "So long, with no word, nor hugging.
    Don't cry and don't grieve your eye."

    And I was trying to say (well, the author, Yesenin, was trying to say): "Don't frown your eyebrows in grief."
    Does this make sense to a native ear? (See???? Same thing!!!! We have TWO ears and still we say "to a foreigner ear". It does sound like we use such expressions figuratively.)

    Thank you.

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