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Thread: jump rope

  1. #1
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    Default jump rope

    I have questions about about jump rope.

    We use the verb play for games -- Children play tennis
    Do we use play for jump rope too?

    children play jump rope
    children do jump rope

    To sucessfully do jump rope, you must keep up with the same pace

    To sucessfully do jump rope, you must keep up with the same with the rhythm

  2. #2
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: jump rope

    Jump rope is a noun describing an activity where children or adults jump over a swinging rope.

    I have also seen it with a hypen inbetween: jump-rope

    Do you want to play jump-rope?

    It can also be a verb.

    I jump rope every morning.
    (similar to: I exercise every morning)

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: jump rope

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    Jump rope is a noun describing an activity where children or adults jump over a swinging rope.

    I have also seen it with a hypen inbetween: jump-rope

    Do you want to play jump-rope?

    It can also be a verb.

    I jump rope every morning.
    (similar to: I exercise every morning)
    This is American English. In the UK, children skip - using a skipping-rope. Sometimes, in school playgrounds, a number of children play a skipping game using a longer rope with one child at each end. One after the other, all the others run in to the middle of the rope - once it has got up speed and try to keep up while the rhythm is increased.

    (People involved in serious sports training - like boxers - talk about 'jumping rope', but the everyday term is 'skipping'.)

    b

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