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    Are these correct? What do they mean?

    1. Only the side of my truck went over the curb. (
    2. Only one side of my truck went over the curb. (Does this make sense? If I say one side, so does that mean my car has two sides? Is that right?)

    What is the difference in meaing between #1 and #2?

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    3. Only a part of my truck went up.
    4. Only part of my truck went up.

  2. #2
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    Hi Jack,

    Re 1 & 2: Both mean essentially the same thing-- not all of the truck went over the curb, but just the two wheels on one side or the other.

    Re 3 & 4: Both are grammatically correct, but neither is semantically meaningful to me. If we finished the sentence thus: 'only (a) part of my truck went up over the curb', then they would have about the same meaning as 1 & 2.

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    'only (a) part of my truck went up over the curb', then they would have about the same meaning as 1 & 2.
    So I can either use 'a' or leave it out? Why can I do that? Isn't 'part' countable? Don't I need an article there?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack

    So I can either use 'a' or leave it out? Why can I do that? Isn't 'part' countable? Don't I need an article there?
    'Part' is one of those words that can be countable or non-count, Jack, considered to mean either 'a section of' or 'some of'.

    Swan (Practical English Usage) expresses it more tentatively, saying " 'A' is usually dropped before 'part' if there is no adjective':

    'Part of the roof was missing.'
    'A large part of the roof was missing.' "

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