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Thread: try it on/out

  1. #1
    Offroad's Avatar
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    Smile try it on/out

    Please, dear teachers,

    whats the difference between these sentences?

    Try it!
    Try it on!
    Try it out!



    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: try it on/out

    In what contexts?

    Try it! = basically, taste it; see if it works; see if you like it

    Try it on! = see if the clothing suits you by putting it on; OR see if you can fool me.

    Try it out! = much the same as #1

  3. #3
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    Smile Re: try it on/out

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    In what contexts?
    Hmm, actually, I saw those sentences on movies and internet sites, and in my opinion they have the same meaning.

    Try it! = basically, taste it; see if it works; see if you like it
    clear as crystal
    Try it on! = see if the clothing suits you by putting it on; OR see if you can fool me.
    Yes, you just guessed "the scene", on that movie a housekeeper was asking a kid to try some kind of suit.
    However, as for "see if you can fool me", I can't see any difference from "see if it works, try to fool me"

    Try it out! = much the same as #1
    I suppose the particle "out" make the conversation more informal, right?
    I also suppose the prepositions is pretty much important and should not be dropped even knowing the sentence will be understood, however, how could one know when use them properly and sound natural speaking English?
    Is there any other preposition that goes with 'try' and has similar meanings?
    Thank you very much.

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