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    #1

    I don't understand this monologue

    Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace, Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,-- Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts, That quench the fire of your pernicious rage With purple fountains issuing from your veins, On pain of torture, from those bloody hands Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground, And hear the sentence of your moved prince. Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets, And made Verona's ancient citizens Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments, To wield old partisans, in hands as old, Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate: If ever you disturb our streets again, Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace. For this time, all the rest depart away: You Capulet; shall go along with me: And, Montague, come you this afternoon, To know our further pleasure in this case,
    To old Free-town, our common judgment-place. Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.



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    #2

    Re: I don't understand this monologue

    Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace, Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel -- Will they not hear?

    What, ho! you men, you beasts, that quench the fire of your pernicious rage with purple fountains issuing from your veins - on pain of torture, from those bloody hands throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground, and hear the sentence of your moved prince.

    Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word by thee, old Capulet and Montague, have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets, and made Verona's ancient citizens cast by their grave beseeming ornaments to wield old partisans in hands as old.

    Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate: if ever you disturb our streets again, your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.

    For this time, all the rest depart away.

    You, Capulet, shall go along with me: And, Montague, come you this afternoon to know our further pleasure in this case to old Free-town, our common judgment-place.

    Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.


    It is not a monologue, since it is is addressed to the fighting Capulets and Montagues.

    Read the sentences out loud - several times if necessary. Remember the situation in which the speech is made.

    Give us your possible interpretation.

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    #3

    Re: I don't understand this monologue

    For Heaven's sake... This is the third time (or have I missed a few?) that you've posted the same speech, been asked to make an effort, and haven't. Anglika's been very helpful, breaking the speech up into bits that make sense on ther own. Please try...

    b


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    #4

    Re: I don't understand this monologue

    Anglika, im sorry but you are erroneous. It is a monologue because a monologue is a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor.

    I have asked my teacher what this monologue meant and instead of questioning me she actually helped me to understand it.

    I figured out that it was not very lapalissian and limpid after all.

    It is ok if you do not understand the monologue yourself.
    Now for me to help you. Next time, just don't reply to a persons question if it has been repeated or if you don't actually know the answer.
    Thanks,
    Maddie


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    #5

    Re: I don't understand this monologue

    Quote Originally Posted by madd.ryan View Post
    Anglika, im sorry but you are erroneous. It is a monologue because a monologue is a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor.

    I have asked my teacher what this monologue meant and instead of questioning me she actually helped me to understand it.

    I figured out that it was not very lapalissian and limpid after all.

    It is ok if you do not understand the monologue yourself.
    Now for me to help you. Next time, just don't reply to a persons question if it has been repeated or if you don't actually know the answer.
    Thanks,
    Maddie
    A monologue is indeed a long uninterrupted speech by somebody: a long tedious uninterrupted speech during a conversation. And I do indeed understand this particular extract, having both read the play many times and seen in acted.

    We do not do or correct homework; we discuss language. It is not our practice to do the work for you, but to assist you to do it in the best way. I would be grateful if you could follow the rules of the forum and make some attempt to interpret the speech before accusing others of not answering properly.


    Please define "lapalissian".


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    #6

    Re: I don't understand this monologue

    Please do not be angry with me. And don't worry because i am not accusing you.
    Lapalissian comes from the italian word lapalissiano meaning clear or obvious.
    One last question "Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word" Who said the "airy word"? Was it Capulet, but maybe Montague, who is equally at fault.
    And is airy meaning he swore? Could this be a dramatic technique?


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    #7

    Re: I don't understand this monologue

    Quote Originally Posted by madd.ryan View Post
    Please do not be angry with me. And don't worry because i am not accusing you.
    Lapalissian comes from the italian word lapalissiano meaning clear or obvious. Interesting - do you have a dictionary reference for it as an English word?

    One last question "Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word" Who said the "airy word"? Was it Capulet, but maybe Montague, who is equally at fault.
    And is airy meaning he swore? Could this be a dramatic technique?
    No problems.

    "bred of an airy word" - the brawls occurred because of some light comment that was made, probably something facetious, that was regarded as offensive. Both sides have done this, as indicated by Prince Esculus when he says: by thee, old Capulet, and Montague,

    The preceding events, if you read through the scene, show how both sides were quick to take offence.

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