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  1. #1
    dilermando is offline Member
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    sue and phrasal verbs

    Recently I have came across with the following expression. "Fail to do so and I'll sue your tail off." Take a look at http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...stion-9-a.html if you want to know more.

    It turns out that I have done a search for pharsal verbs containing the verb "to sue", but I have just found "to sue out" at:

    sue out definition |Dictionary.com

    My question is: Why there are verbs with so few phrasal verbs containing it?

    Please, I will appreciate if you correct my writing.

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is online now VIP Member
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    Re: sue and phrasal verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by dilermando View Post
    Recently I have came across with the following expression. "Fail to do so and I'll sue your tail off." Take a look at http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...stion-9-a.html if you want to know more.

    It turns out that I have done a search for phrasal verbs containing the verb "to sue", but I have just found "to sue out" at:

    sue out definition |Dictionary.com

    My question is: Why are there verbs with so few phrasal verbs containing it?

    Please, I will appreciate if you correct my writing.
    You can't use the phrase "It turns out" if the only reason "it turns out" is that you've done it. It is used for a happening that you didn't know about until later. For example "I was going to answer your question, but it turns out that someone has already done it".

    To your question: "Sue" means to litigate against. Given that in phrasal verbs, there is usually some meaning issuing from the verb, surely you'd expect "sue" to make fewer phrasal verbs than "get", "take", etc. which have multiple meanings.

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