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Thread: go up,

  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default go up,

    Dear teachers,

    I have three qustions to ask:

    No.1
    He couldn't spend his time going after money.
    As far as I know I can say "'Something goes for certain amount of money" Can I say "somebody goes for money"? Or can I use "for'' to replace "after" in the example?
    No2
    The bomb went _____ in front of the embassy.
    a. up b. off
    The key is "b". No problem. But "to up" can mean to suddenly explode. For example:
    There's a gas leak and the whole building could go up at any moment.
    So can I use "up" instead of "off" in the example?
    No.3
    It's much too noisy for my taste.
    Is "for one's taste" a collocation?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
    colloquium is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: go up,

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have three qustions to ask:

    No.1
    He couldn't spend his time going after money.
    As far as I know I can say "'Something goes for certain amount of money" Can I say "somebody goes for money"? Or can I use "for'' to replace "after" in the example?

    After and for cannot be alternated freely, but in certain contexts constructions can be formed with for which have a similar meaning.

    A) Why has John decided to work in Dubai?

    B) He is going for the money.

    A) Why does John often work in Dubai?

    B) He goes for the money.

    However He couldn't spend his time going for money is incorrect, or at best very awkward and unusual.


    No2
    The bomb went _____ in front of the embassy.
    a. up b. off
    The key is "b". No problem. But "to up" can mean to suddenly explode. For example:
    There's a gas leak and the whole building could go up at any moment.
    So can I use "up" instead of "off" in the example?

    No. Your example is short for the whole building could go up in flames.

    No.3
    It's much too noisy for my taste.
    Is "for one's taste" a collocation?

    I am not sure.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    I am not a teacher.
    Last edited by colloquium; 17-Sep-2008 at 15:56.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: go up,

    As far as I know I can say "'Something goes for certain amount of money"

    Here, 'goes for' = 'sells for'
    Watch your indefinite and definite articles:
    "'Something goes for a certain amount of money"[/COLOR]

    "somebody goes for money"?

    Here, 'goes for' means 'is motivated by the incentive of the money being offered to make some change in his life/to move to where this opportunity to make more money is//relocate himself (and hence 'go' to where the money is.)
    Watch your indefinite and definite articles:
    'somebody goes for the money (being offered)'

    'go off' is colloquial for 'explode'. That's what a bomb does. What the bomb explodes, it blows a building apart, with debris going sideways and up in the air - it is the building (as it is blown into pieces) which 'goes up' (in the air).
    A gas leak causes an explosion. The force of this possible explosion if the gas is ignited could cause 'the whole building (to) go up at any moment' - it will blow the building apart, (sideways and) up.
    Last edited by David L.; 17-Sep-2008 at 23:41.

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