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    #1

    what the adverb clause modifies

    Hi, I'm new here and currently studying different types of clauses (adjective, adverb and noun) on DailyGrammar online, it's not easy for me to determine what they are and what part (word) of the main clause they modify.

    I can't decide which word the adverb clause modifies in the following sentence, examples:
    1. Buy that coat now because it might be sold tomorrow.
    (book's A: because it might be sold tomorrow modifies the verb buy)
    I chos the adverb "now" because I thought the main emphasis/reason of the surbordinate clause laid on "tomorrow". If the adverb clause said: "because you need one", I would go with "buy", am I right?. Compare:
    Since I can spare only a few minutes, please be brief with your presentation.
    (A: Since I can spare only a few minutes modifies the predicate adjective brief) The word modified is not the verb "be" rather it's the pred. adjective "brief", I'm assuming that's because its indication of time crunch.

    So my impressioin was knowing which word, along its part of speech, is modified has a lot to do with what the adverb clause main focuse is, but I must have been mistaken. Could someone be kind enough to give me some guidance in deciding what to pick, is there a rule of thumb? Thanks a lot.
    Note: the grammar rules say: An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

    Regards
    Raen


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    #2

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    Anyone? Please I need help:(

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    Re:
    Buy that coat now because it might be sold tomorrow.
    I would say that because it might be sold tomorrow modifies Buy that coat now. But if you have to narrow it down to a single word then it modifies buy.

    Re:
    Since I can spare only a few minutes, please be brief with your presentation.
    Since I can spare only a few minutes modifies be brief or be (if you have to narrow it down to a single word).



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    #4

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    Thank you Ronbee,

    I'm studying grammar because I soon will be taking a grammar test. And as fate would have it, it calls for narrowing it down to specific word or part of speech. If it's up to me, I would opt for the most generality as my answer: the sub clause modifies the main clause!

    The grammar rules dictate that, in #1 example the sub clause modifies singularly the verb "buy" and #2) modifies the adjective "brief" alone not "be brief".

    Is there a rule of thumb? Is there a trick that I can exercise for bullet-proof answers? Or am I, the easily confused, just doomed?

    Thanks again
    Raen

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    Quote Originally Posted by Raen View Post
    If it's up to me, I would opt for the most generality as my answer: the sub clause modifies the main clause!
    I agree. Rather than saying that an adjectival or adverbial phrase or clause modifies a specific word it often makes more sense to say that it modifies the rest of the sentence.



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    #6

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    I agree. Rather than saying that an adjectival or adverbial phrase or clause modifies a specific word it often makes more sense to say that it modifies the rest of the sentence.
    You do know I was being facitious right?

    Thanks again. Ronbee.

    Raen

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    #7

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    Quote Originally Posted by Raen View Post
    You do know I was being facitious right?
    Um, facetious?



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    #8

    Re: what the adverb clause modifies

    Sorry, Ronbee, I wasn't being specific.

    I meant my comment of: the sub clause modifies the main clause.

    Using that as a blanket answer to all questions could secure me a plot in the graveyard.

    That's what I meant. I didn't mean this was a mock thread. Sowie.


    Raen

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