Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Dear respectful teachers,

    I'd like some answer to this sentence,

    Her idea that I hire you was a very funny one.

    Is the part I underlined, in your opinion, a noun clause as an appositive or adjective noun that modifies "Her idea"? Thank you very much.

    Raen

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Don't people answer a sincere inquiry here? What does one have to do to get a response?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Do none of the teachers here know the answer to this ligitimate question therefore this is a wrong place to ask? Or do the teachers pick and choose the inquiry that are easy opportunities to excercise their tool of power which is English grammar and not go out of their way to really reach out to at least start a discussion?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,736
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Raen View Post
    Do none of the teachers here know the answer to this ligitimate question therefore this is a wrong place to ask? Or do the teachers pick and choose the inquiry that are easy opportunities to excercise their tool of power which is English grammar and not go out of their way to really reach out to at least start a discussion?
    You only waited about half an hour before posting your frowning hurry-up follow-up. This would be reason enough for me not to respond, even if I had been awake and online when you posted.
    To your above questions:
    Yes, I'm sure there are teachers here who could answer your previous question.
    Yes, this is the right place to ask.
    Yes, respondents can pick and choose. We are volunteers (we get paid nothing; and you pay nothing, even though it's possible that you couldn't pay for some of the information you get here). No, some of us who give our time and knowledge for nothing actually pick the more difficult questions. Your assumptions about power trips etc. are baseless.
    I hope that this answers at least the above queries.

  5. #5
    2006 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Raen View Post
    Dear respectful teachers,

    I'd like some answer to this sentence,

    Her idea that I hire you was a very funny one.

    Is the part I underlined, in your opinion, a noun clause as an appositive or adjective noun that modifies "Her idea"? Thank you very much.

    Raen
    1...I agree with Raymott's comments.
    2...The underlined part is an adjective clause modifying the noun "idea".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    [HTML]
    You only waited about half an hour before posting your frowning hurry-up follow-up.
    [/HTML]

    It's more than 5 hours since I started the thread with 2 messages replying to my own pleading for help.

    [HTML]
    This would be reason enough for me not to respond, even if I had been awake and online when you posted.

    [/HTML]

    I would not have expected you to

    [HTML]
    Yes, I'm sure there are teachers here who could answer your previous question.
    Yes, this is the right place to ask.

    [/HTML]

    It's ligitimate to have wondered what was stopping them before my "frowny hurry-up follow-up" whine.

    [HTML]
    Yes, respondents can pick and choose. We are volunteers (we get paid nothing; and you pay nothing, even though it's possible that you couldn't pay for some of the information you get here).
    [/HTML]

    It's also reasonable to ask what I should have done to get a response, as I did in the 2nd message: flash a red flag to the title? put a big fat smiling-cute/a-"beats-me"/show-you-my-full-set-of-teeth facial expression, or slam the title with 3 exclamation marks indicating "I'm begging"? What ticks the teachers here? What's the magic word? I compared my question to other posters, I find no incriminating evidence in mine that prevented a response.

    I can only think of a few services on the internet that requires payment.

    [HTML]
    some of us who give our time and knowledge for nothing actually pick the more difficult questions.
    [/HTML]

    Please show me your examples, I'm eager to learn.

    [HTML]Your assumptions about power trips etc. are baseless.[/HTML]

    I've read some of your arguments on certain grammar points.

    [HTML]I hope that this answers at least the above queries. [/HTML]

    No, you're off track, distracted by power.



    After my first inquiry before this thread went unanswered I took action thinking maybe it's the way to go. Silly me, what I got is a lectures of manners.

    To 2006,

    [HTML]2...The underlined part is an adjective clause modifying the noun "idea".[/HTML]

    After my failed attempts here, other experts from different forums have kindly and promptly answered my inquiry in details, they clearly would beg to differ. But nonetheless, I sincerely thank you for your effort. thanks.

    Raen

  7. #7
    enydia is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    414
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Raen View Post
    [html]
    You only waited about half an hour before posting your frowning hurry-up follow-up.
    [/html]

    It's more than 5 hours since I started the thread with 2 messages replying to my own pleading for help.

    [html]
    This would be reason enough for me not to respond, even if I had been awake and online when you posted.

    [/html]

    I would not have expected you to

    [html]
    Yes, I'm sure there are teachers here who could answer your previous question.
    Yes, this is the right place to ask.

    [/html]

    It's ligitimate to have wondered what was stopping them before my "frowny hurry-up follow-up" whine.

    [html]
    Yes, respondents can pick and choose. We are volunteers (we get paid nothing; and you pay nothing, even though it's possible that you couldn't pay for some of the information you get here).
    [/html]

    It's also reasonable to ask what I should have done to get a response, as I did in the 2nd message: flash a red flag to the title? put a big fat smiling-cute/a-"beats-me"/show-you-my-full-set-of-teeth facial expression, or slam the title with 3 exclamation marks indicating "I'm begging"? What ticks the teachers here? What's the magic word? I compared my question to other posters, I find no incriminating evidence in mine that prevented a response.

    I can only think of a few services on the internet that requires payment.

    [html]
    some of us who give our time and knowledge for nothing actually pick the more difficult questions.
    [/html]

    Please show me your examples, I'm eager to learn.

    [html]Your assumptions about power trips etc. are baseless.[/html]

    I've read some of your arguments on certain grammar points.

    [html]I hope that this answers at least the above queries. [/html]

    No, you're off track, distracted by power.



    After my first inquiry before this thread went unanswered I took action thinking maybe it's the way to go. Silly me, what I got is a lectures of manners.

    To 2006,

    [html]2...The underlined part is an adjective clause modifying the noun "idea".[/html]

    After my failed attempts here, other experts from different forums have kindly and promptly answered my inquiry in details, they clearly would beg to differ. But nonetheless, I sincerely thank you for your effort. thanks.

    Raen
    My English may be much poorer than yours.
    But I'm ashamed of you.
    I pay nothing but I get much here.

  8. #8
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Quote Originally Posted by Raen View Post
    Dear respectful teachers,

    I'd like some answer to this sentence,

    Her idea that I hire you was a very funny one.

    Is the part I underlined, in your opinion, a noun clause as an appositive or adjective noun that modifies "Her idea"? Thank you very much.

    Raen
    Raen,

    Appositions
    Noun phrase
    Ex: The opera Carmen
    Ex: Peter, the bank manager

    Non-restrictive relative clause
    Ex: His theory, which is really nonsensical,...

    Appositive that-clause
    Ex: His suggestion, that we should stay calm,...
    Ex: The reason that he gave was ...
    Ex: Her idea that I hire you was ...

    Appositive to-clause
    Ex: The idea to hire you was ...
    Ex: The plot to assassinate him was ...

    Appositive that-clause: the head of the noun phrase must be general abstract noun such as fact, idea, proposition, reply, remark, answer and the like. (Quirk et. al. A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language)


    Source Sanseido Word-Wise Web ?????????? WISDOM in Depth: #22



    From Lin 3098 Corpus Linguistics 3098:

    Appositive clauses distinguished from restrictive relative clauses

    Relative Clause
    Ex: The dog that I saw yesterday ...
    => Restricts the reference of the head noun.
    Appositive Clause
    Ex: The fact that I came ...
    => Does not restrict the reference of the head noun. It qualifies or amplifies the head noun.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Thank you soup, I owe you much (no pun intended here, truely!)

    The distinctions that tell apart Appositive clauses from Adjective clauses have been made very clear to me by you, along with other undiscriminating language experts. I can't thank you enough.

    As difining as it is, grammar has always grey areas where John and Pete would argue over till sundown and pick up the same argument when the sun rises again. My sequencial question that's still in dispute is this, in the following sentence, is the who-clause an appositive>

    Pet who is the richesst man in town has been indicted.

    Some argue it's not, but isn't Pet = who is the richest man in town?

    Waiting eagerly for your reply.


    To India,

    My English may be much poorer than yours.
    But I'm ashamed of you.
    I pay nothing but I get much here.
    Good for you, this is a highly respected forum that has this noble tag of "non-profitable" and rightly so recommended to me. You wouldn't wanna defile it by turning it into a payment-base service, would you? Knowledge is priceless!

    I am incredibly and humbly grateful where thanks are rightly due, and I believed I have demonstrated that already.


    Raen

  10. #10
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Noun clause or Adjective clause

    Re:
    Pete, who is the richest man in town, has been indicted.
    The appositive phrase (in bold) undoubtedly refers to Pete.


Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. NOUN CLAUSE help needed!!!!
    By hazeleyedgirl in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Aug-2008, 00:00
  2. Red -- predicate adjective or predicate noun? Or both? (previous post)
    By donnach in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-May-2008, 14:51
  3. noun as adjective
    By b1ffyi59 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2008, 07:08
  4. past participle + preposition
    By donnach in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-Feb-2008, 16:18
  5. sentence structure question
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2008, 09:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •