Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,974
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: Northanger Abbey

    [quote=JACOOL;362940]
    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi! I am reading Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen.

    Talking of books and particularly, Jane Austen's , whom I'm so interested in her books, What made you read this particular story? If may ask. However, I'm only asking to find a reason to start reading it, since I've bought it quite a long time ago, yet got busy reading other books. I want a boost, if I may say. thanks.
    Hi Jacool,

    I had watched the film -Northanger Abbey so I wanted to read the original novel to learn the British society in 19th century, to see what the difference between novel and film, and to learn Austin's language style.

  2. #12
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Northanger Abbey

    [quote=thedaffodils;362997]
    Quote Originally Posted by JACOOL View Post

    Hi Jacool,

    I had watched the film -Northanger Abbey so I wanted to read the original novel to learn the British society in 19th century, to see what the difference between novel and film, and to learn Austin's language style.
    When reading Jane Austen, you must keep in mind that she was writing in the very early years of the 19th century, and that many of her views and means of expression are 18th century. To see how life and language changed, you could plan to read authors in the chronological order of their lives.

    Austen
    Dickens
    Gaskell
    Eliot
    Bronte
    Thackeray
    Trollope
    Last edited by Anglika; 06-Oct-2008 at 17:12.

  3. #13
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,974
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: Northanger Abbey

    Re: #12

    Hello Anglika,

    Thank you very much for your advice!

  4. #14
    JACOOL is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Northanger Abbey

    [QUOTE=thedaffodils;362997]
    Quote Originally Posted by JACOOL View Post

    Hi Jacool,

    I had watched the film -Northanger Abbey so I wanted to read the original novel to learn the British society in 19th century, to see what the difference between novel and film, and to learn Austin's language style.
    Well, I see. And what have you found so interested about the story?

  5. #15
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,974
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: Northanger Abbey

    [quote=JACOOL;363144]
    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post

    Well, I see. And what have you found so interested about the story?
    Hi Jacool,

    During thousand years of Chinese feudal society including 18th and 19th centuries, Chinese women were confined into their houses and could not meet any strange men except for their own father, brothers. They were arranged to marry a strange man, who they never met. They were treated as just reproductive tools and private property of their husband but not independent-minded individuals. This sounds unthinkable if it happens to me today. However, ordinary British women in the 18th century, like the protagonist Catherine, could have chances to socialise with people and know men by themselves. It's interesting for me to see the contrast of different societies.

    Jane Austen's stories stress the social class between the couple of marriage - This reflects from two novels by her I have dabbled so far - Northanger Abbey and and Pride and Prejudice. Money or class was very important to a marriage. General Tilney was convinced by the rumour-Catherine was from a destitute family. He disinherited his son -Henry if he persisted to marry a poor girl. Austen arranged Henry decided to give up his fortune and marry Catherine. It was a great courage for a man at that time though I assume such a case might be rather rare in the UK of the 18th century except for the existence of novels, still it was an encouraging spark of mind. Catherine was not pennyless as the rumour General Tilney had taken for granted. Though she was not very rich as General Tilney expected, Catherine and Henry were at the same class. Austen extolled the power of the true love and still confined herself to the concept of class. I'm curious to learn the thoughts and minds of Westerners'.

    Critics commented Jane Austen's language was ironic, humourous and vivid. My English knowledge limits me to really appreciate it well. Yet, I still can peep the humour between the lines more or less.The authoress described Catherine's mother "drown in the tears"; Isabella's tag "My dear creature"...

    Another feature of this novel is Northanger Abbey is a novel per se. However, Austen put double novels in the story. Catherine was a Gothic fiction fan. She put herself into a fantasy of the fiction about everything she encountered in Bath. She was a lovely naive young girl.

    I haven't yet finished reading the novel. I plow it slowly because there're many new words I have to hurdle.
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 07-Oct-2008 at 11:53.

  6. #16
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,767
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Northanger Abbey

    [QUOTE=thedaffodils;363425]
    Quote Originally Posted by JACOOL View Post

    Hi Jacool,

    During thousand years of Chinese feudal society including 18th and 19th centuries, Chinese women were confined into their houses and could not meet any strange men except for their own father, brothers. They were arranged to marry a strange man, who they never met. They were treated as just reproductive tools and private property of their husband but not independent-minded individuals. This sounds unthinkable if it happens to me today. However, ordinary British women in the 18th century, like the protagonist Catherine, could have chances to socialise with people and know men by themselves. It's interesting for me to see the contrast of different societies.

    Jane Austen's stories stress the social class between the couple of marriage - This reflects from two novels by her I have dabbled so far - Northanger Abbey and and Pride and Prejudice. Money or class was very important to a marriage. General Tilney was convinced by the rumour-Catherine was from a destitute family. He disinherited his son -Henry if he persisted to marry a poor girl. Austen arranged Henry decided to give up his fortune and marry Catherine. It was a great courage for a man at that time though I assume such a case might be rather rare in the UK of the 18th century except for the existence of novels, still it was an encouraging spark of mind. Catherine was not pennyless as the rumour General Tilney had taken for granted. Though she was not very rich as General Tilney expected, Catherine and Henry were at the same class. Austen extolled the power of the true love and still confined herself to the concept of class. I'm curious to learn the thoughts and minds of Westerners'.

    Critics commented Jane Austen's language was ironic, humourous and vivid. My English knowledge limits me to really appreciate it well. Yet, I still can peep the humour between the lines more or less.The authoress described Catherine's mother "drown in the tears"; Isabella's tag "My dear creature"...

    Another feature of this novel is Northanger Abbey is a novel per se. However, Austen put double novels in the story. Catherine was a Gothic fiction fan. She put herself into a fantasy of the fiction about everything she encountered in Bath. She was a lovely naive young girl.

    I haven't yet finished reading the novel. I plow it slowly because there're many new words I have to hurdle.
    I think the next on your list should be Emma - as an example of woman's place in 18th century English society (or maybe Mansfield Park - though that, for me, was less of a 'page-turner').
    -
    By the way, I like the agricultural metaphors in your last sentence (before hurdles were used as obstacles for athletes, they were used to make fences). An interesting point about your use of 'plow' (that's the Am E spelling, by the way. I'll use 'plough' in my examples):

    What you 'plough' is a field. When it is used metaphorically, you add 'through': Riot police 'plough through' a crowd; or you 'plough through a book'.

    Other colloquial uses:

    'To plough [in] an exam' - to do very badly
    'To plough into the ground' - (of a plane) to crash
    'To plough a lonely furrow' - to do lonely work

    Last edited by BobK; 07-Oct-2008 at 12:36. Reason: Added bit about hurdles

  7. #17
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,974
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: Northanger Abbey

    Hi BobK,

    Thank you very much for your advice and corrections.

    Have a good day!

  8. #18
    JACOOL is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: Northanger Abbey

    [QUOTE=thedaffodils;363425]
    Quote Originally Posted by JACOOL View Post

    Hi Jacool,

    During thousand years of Chinese feudal society including 18th and 19th centuries, Chinese women were confined into their houses and could not meet any strange men except for their own father, brothers. They were arranged to marry a strange man, who they never met. They were treated as just reproductive tools and private property of their husband but not independent-minded individuals. This sounds unthinkable if it happens to me today. However, ordinary British women in the 18th century, like the protagonist Catherine, could have chances to socialise with people and know men by themselves. It's interesting for me to see the contrast of different societies.

    Jane Austen's stories stress the social class between the couple of marriage - This reflects from two novels by her I have dabbled so far - Northanger Abbey and and Pride and Prejudice. Money or class was very important to a marriage. General Tilney was convinced by the rumour-Catherine was from a destitute family. He disinherited his son -Henry if he persisted to marry a poor girl. Austen arranged Henry decided to give up his fortune and marry Catherine. It was a great courage for a man at that time though I assume such a case might be rather rare in the UK of the 18th century except for the existence of novels, still it was an encouraging spark of mind. Catherine was not pennyless as the rumour General Tilney had taken for granted. Though she was not very rich as General Tilney expected, Catherine and Henry were at the same class. Austen extolled the power of the true love and still confined herself to the concept of class. I'm curious to learn the thoughts and minds of Westerners'.

    Critics commented Jane Austen's language was ironic, humourous and vivid. My English knowledge limits me to really appreciate it well. Yet, I still can peep the humour between the lines more or less.The authoress described Catherine's mother "drown in the tears"; Isabella's tag "My dear creature"...

    Another feature of this novel is Northanger Abbey is a novel per se. However, Austen put double novels in the story. Catherine was a Gothic fiction fan. She put herself into a fantasy of the fiction about everything she encountered in Bath. She was a lovely naive young girl.

    I haven't yet finished reading the novel. I plow it slowly because there're many new words I have to hurdle.
    Now this what I call a boost!!! thanks alot. However, I've read 'Pride & prejudice' a wonderful novel it was. And, thanks to you, I'm going to read Northeanger Abbey

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Northanger Abbey

    If I may, I would recommend you read a summary first. If possible, one which explains the heavy references to Gothic novels present in Northanger Abbey.

    Gothic novels were a craze then, and Jane Austen mocks them subtly - and not so subtly - throughout her novel.

    One reader who knows nothing of the background will easily get confused without context.
    Last edited by Rebel; 15-Oct-2008 at 14:06.

  10. #20
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,974
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Northanger Abbey

    Hello Rebel,

    Thank you for your advice.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •