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Thread: 'in' or 'for'?

  1. #11
    colloquium is offline Senior Member
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hi,
    I think the right way is "in the picture" yet the the picture is a 2d object. it seems to me that prepositions don't follow a logical line of thought and seldomly obey any kind of rule (unfortunately).
    regards.
    They are hard to remember, and often it really is just a case of having to remember, because as you correctly suggest, they don't always follow rules.

    If you take some kind of material (such as wool) and (physically) paste/place it onto another kind of material: it is pasted/placed on. In the same sense as you would place a glass on a table. The same idea can be applied to the newspaper example: when they make newspapers, they print the words/pictures on the page. However when you speak about the words and pictures once they have been printed, you refer to them as being in the paper.

    In normally means within the confines of. For instance, I put the money in my pocket (within the confines of my pocket), but unfortunately in is also used in less clear circumstances (such as in the paper).

    I think it is often a case of having to learn a lot of prepositions as you learn the phrases they accompany. I have found this to be true when trying to learn French. The preposition with in English has various French equivalents.

    Il ecrit avec un crayon = He writes with a pencil

    Il ecrit de la main gauche = He writes with his left hand

    (Schaum's Outlines: French Grammar).

    I think the difficulties of preposition use (in general) are well illustrated by you, jctgf, as regardless your good level of English, you still struggle with them at times.

  2. #12
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    On should be used.

    However (in case you are unaware)


    • Paste the wool on the picture given


    is not a correct sentence.
    Why not?
    I agree that the probable meaning is "Paste the wool onto the picture given".
    Is that your concern?

  3. #13
    colloquium is offline Senior Member
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Why not?
    I agree that the probable meaning is "Paste the wool onto the picture given".
    Is that your concern?
    Although onto does seem like a better choice, that is not what I was referring to.

    Given, in this context seems to be the adjective form of the word, and when used in this sense it normally preceeds the noun phrase (or at least that is my understanding).

    ... the given picture.

    I struggle to see how given can be a verb in this sentence without it exhibiting the form of a past tense, perfect tense or passive construction.

    ... the picture I gave you.

    ... the picture I have given you.

    ... the picture you were given.

    But please, Raymott, let me know why you think (or know) the original sentence is correct.

  4. #14
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    Although onto does seem like a better choice, that is not what I was referring to.

    Given, in this context seems to be the adjective form of the word, and when used in this sense it normally preceeds the noun phrase (or at least that is my understanding).

    ... the given picture.

    I struggle to see how given can be a verb in this sentence without it exhibiting the form of a past tense, perfect tense or passive construction.

    ... the picture I gave you.

    ... the picture I have given you.

    ... the picture you were given.

    But please, Raymott, let me know why you think (or know) the original sentence is correct.
    "Given" is an adjective formed from the past participle.
    Do you have a problem with these:
    "Paste it onto the picture provided".
    "Please see the letter attached".
    "Take a look at the evidence found".
    "What will we do with the money given?"


  5. #15
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hi,
    what does "paste the wool on the picture" mean, please?
    thanks.
    If it is not a correct sentence then what's the correct way to say it. The picture of a sheep is drawn on a piece of paper and I am saying children to paste the wool on it. what's wrong in it?

  6. #16
    colloquium is offline Senior Member
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "Given" is an adjective formed from the past participle.
    Do you have a problem with these:
    "Paste it onto the picture provided".
    "Please see the letter attached".
    "Take a look at the evidence found".
    "What will we do with the money given?"

    No, I see your point entirely.

    The first 3 seem common, but for some reason the 4th makes me suspicious because I don't often come across given used in such a manner (totally unfounded suspicion). I was wrong to question the sentence.

    Roselin, your sentence is fine (sorry for any confusion I have caused).

    However as Raymott sugested you can use the preposition onto (which is perhaps the better choice) but on is also fine.

  7. #17
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Hi,
    I have a doubt regarding the verb ''paste'', please. I know it's very used in Microsoft Office to mean ''stick'', ''glue'' or something similar. I'd like to know if it can be used in informal talks, please.

  8. #18
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi,
    I have a doubt regarding the verb ''paste'', please. I know it's very used in Microsoft Office to mean ''stick'', ''glue'' or something similar. I'd like to know if it can be used in informal talks, please.
    what do you mean by informal talks? Haven't you heard teachers giving instructions to their students to paste the pictures on their notebooks. Here I have heard people using paste more often than stick.


    paste Show phonetics
    verb
    1 [T usually + adverb or preposition] to stick something to something, especially with paste:
    You can make your own distorting mirror by pasting a sheet of kitchen foil to a piece of thin cardboard.

  9. #19
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    They went to arrest him inthe murders of his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman.

    Why did nobody notice the word murder, here? Why murders and not murder ?

  10. #20
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: 'in' or 'for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roselin View Post
    They went to arrest him in the murders of his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman.

    Why did nobody notice the word murder, here? Why murders and not murder ?
    hi,
    it's because there are 2 murders indeed. the Nicole's murder and the Ronald's one.
    regards.

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