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Thread: Determiner


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #21

    Re: Determiner

    11. is incorrect. If you're going to use 'the', then you're going to have to make customer service specific, like this, the customer service desk.
    1. You can go to the customer service and ask for it. (So this is incorrect? Why? Isn't 'service' a countable noun? Why do I have to be specific with 'the'?)

    For eg.
    2. You can go over there for the car. (I don't need to say you need to go over there for 'the car department'? I don't need to be specific with 'the' here? Why is #1 wrong and this is right?)

    3. You can go to the customer service desk and ask for it. (Why do I need desk here?)
    4. You can go to a customer service and ask for it. (So this is okay? But #1 isn't?)
    Last edited by jack; 07-Dec-2004 at 08:29.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #22

    Re: Determiner

    1. It's a proper noun: the name of a place; i.e., the Customer Service counter; 2. 'car' is not a proper noun; 3. Customer Service (proper noun); The Customer Service counter (proper noun functioning as an adjective. 'the' modifies the noun 'counter'; 4. is incorrect. "a" can't modify a proper noun, and there isn't a noun in the sentence for "a" to modify.


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    #23

    Re: Determiner

    Thanks.

    2. 'car' is not a proper noun
    1. Is 'car' a common noun?

    4. is incorrect. "a" can't modify a proper noun, and there isn't a noun in the sentence for "a" to modify.
    2. So 'a' cannot modify adjectives right?
    Last edited by jack; 07-Dec-2004 at 12:02.


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    #24

    Re: Determiner

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. Who wants to trade textbook for next semester? (Why is this correct? How come I don't need to use a determiner here? Is 'textbook' uncountable here? Or does it mean 'textbook' in general?)
    2. Who wants to trade a textbook for next semester?
    3. Who wants to trade textbooks for next semester?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #25

    Re: Determiner

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. Is 'car' a common noun?
    You're welcome.
    Well, yes, jack, it's common: everyone has one, so it's a common noun.

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    2. So 'a' cannot modify adjectives right?
    Right, and do you know why that is?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #26

    Re: Determiner

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    Jack, it would be beneficial if you could offer us your thoughts on the grammaticality of the sentences you submit. Your participation would be more than welcomed.

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. Who wants to trade textbook for next semester? (Why is this correct? How come I don't need to use a determiner here? Is 'textbook' uncountable here? Or does it mean 'textbook' in general?)
    2. Who wants to trade a textbook for next semester?
    3. Who wants to trade textbooks for next semester?
    1. is incorrect. The word 'textbook' represents an object in the real world, and that object can be counted: one book, two books, etc. So 'textbook' is a count noun, and as long as there are books to count, it will always be a count noun.


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    #27

    Re: Determiner

    Is this correct?
    1. I walked around from (determiner) store to (determiner) store so as to look for a shirt. (How come I don't need to use determiners for this sentence? Isn't 'store' a count noun? Or is it omitted?

    Like this?
    2. I walked around from a store to another store so as to look for a shirt.

    For this sentence below, does it mean 'use' in general? If so, is it a non-cont noun then? Or does it mean 'a presentation use' ?

    http://www.littlepc.com/faq_lcd_technology.htm
    3. Some large monitors for (a/the) presentation use may have a larger dot pitch.

    4. I am using this for presentation. (If this is incorrect, why? #3 is correct?)
    5. I am using this for a presentation.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by jack; 22-Dec-2004 at 08:56.


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    #28

    Re: Determiner

    Could someone help me with the post above? Thanks.

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. Are you paying by credit card? (Does this mean 'credit card' in general?)
    2. Are you paying by a credit card? (One credit card?)


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    #29

    Re: Determiner

    Are these correct? What do they mean?

    1. I can get it for half price from someone else. (How come I don't need a determiner between 'for' and 'half'? Isn't price countable?)
    2. I can get it for a half price from someone else. (How come it sounds awkward with 'a' here? 'price' is countable so why does it sound awkward with 'a' here?)

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