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  1. #1
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    Default "Undersecretary" and "Hon." - political jargon

    Hello,

    I'd be grateful if you could help me dissipate my doubts about this.

    In the Italian political system there are "Ministri" (Secretaries - of Defense, Welfare, Internal Affairs, etc.) who are coadiuvated in their daily job by one Vice-Ministro (Deputy Secretary, I suppose) and usually a few "Sottosegretari" with specific competence on certain areas of interest. This figure of "Sottosegretario" is usually translated literally with "Undersecretary", but I have a feeling the latter means something different in the US system. Don't even know what they are called in the UK. Can you help me with that?

    Also, Italians have a tendency to overabound with unnecessary titles, and in case of politicians we use the term ""Onorevole" (literally "honorable") before the name of any member of the Senate or Congress. I see that the short for Onorevole, "On." is often translated as "Hon." in invitations etc. Is that correct? I kind of remember "Hon." is a title very seldom given, and probably not to politicians? Not sure. I would be really grateful for any help on this.

    Thanks a lot.
    Serena

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: "Undersecretary" and "Hon." - political jargon

    WElcome to the forums.

    Quote Originally Posted by serenutis View Post
    Hello,

    I'd be grateful if you could help me dissipate my doubts about this.

    In the Italian political system there are "Ministri" (Secretaries - of Defense, Welfare, Internal Affairs, etc.) who are coadiuvated in their daily job by one Vice-Ministro (Deputy Secretary, I suppose) and usually a few "Sottosegretari" with specific competence on certain areas of interest. This figure of "Sottosegretario" is usually translated literally with "Undersecretary", but I have a feeling the latter means something different in the US system. Don't even know what they are called in the UK. Can you help me with that?

    Also, Italians have a tendency to overabound with unnecessary titles, and in case of politicians we use the term ""Onorevole" (literally "honorable") before the name of any member of the Senate or Congress. I see that the short for Onorevole, "On." is often translated as "Hon." in invitations etc. Is that correct? I kind of remember "Hon." is a title very seldom given, and probably not to politicians? Not sure. I would be really grateful for any help on this.

    Thanks a lot.
    Serena
    In the UK Government, the senior Cabinet members are titled Secretary of State, with lesser members being Ministers.

    Honourable is a title used before the name of all MPs and senior government officials. Cabinet members have the title "Right Honourable". Cabinet of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "Undersecretary" and "Hon." - political jargon

    Quote Originally Posted by serenutis View Post
    I kind of remember "Hon." is a title very seldom given, and probably not to politicians? Not sure. I would be really grateful for any help on this.

    Thanks a lot.
    Serena
    "Honourable" is a title given to all members of parliament in the British-type systems. But you are right; it is most often not an appropriate term.

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