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Thread: literally

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    #1

    literally

    Hi! Teachers:
    When I look new words up in the dictionary , I often see the symbol(literally).
    I wonder what it mean to native speakers?
    Could you clarify it for me?
    Does it mean the word is often used in writing rather than common daily converstaion or---?
    Hopefully, I can get the answer.
    Thanks a lot!

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    #2

    Re: literally

    Quote Originally Posted by WUKEN View Post
    Hi! Teachers:
    When I look new words up in the dictionary , I often see the symbol(literally).
    I wonder what it mean to native speakers?
    Could you clarify it for me?
    Does it mean the word is often used in writing rather than common daily converstaion or---?
    Hopefully, I can get the answer.
    Thanks a lot!
    If you mean literary (which you probably do), it means that the term is somewhat poetic, and not used much informally.
    If, in fact, you do mean literally, it means that the definition is the primary denotation of the word, not a figurative sense. However, this is what dictionaries normally give first, so I doubt whether any dictionary would keep claiming that they are giving a literal definition.

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    #3

    Re: literally

    Sorry! Could you elaborate or make an example?
    I stilll don't have a grasp of it.

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    #4

    Re: literally

    Quote Originally Posted by WUKEN View Post
    Sorry! Could you elaborate or make an example?
    I stilll don't have a grasp of it.
    Could you check the symbol? - what it says, and what it means?


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    #5

    Re: literally

    In the dictionary, after a word but before it gives the actual definition, does it read 'literary' or 'literally'?

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    #6

    Re: literally

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    In the dictionary, after a word but before it gives the actual definition, does it read 'literary' or 'literally'?
    And if it says "lit." what does the legend in front of the book claim is the meaning of "lit." in the book.

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    #7

    Re: literally

    Sorry! Your are right! I typed the wrong word.
    Let me correct it.
    I always see the symbol(literary) in the dictionary when I look up new words I am learning in the dictionary.
    For example,my source says Farewell means the same as goodbye.( literary)
    For example, my source says eyrie refers to a place such as a house or a castle as an eyrie.(literary)

    I wonder what it means. Could you clarify it for me?Does it mean it's used in the writing rather than converstaion or other meaning?
    Thanks for your teaching!
    Last edited by WUKEN; 10-Oct-2008 at 16:59.


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    #8

    Re: literally

    It means that it is not a word that will be used in normal conversation. It will be chiefly found in highly formal literary writing.

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    #9

    Re: literally

    Thanks for Anglika's clarification!

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