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  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default set in, set about, attribute or adverbial

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    A new economic recession has set in for that country.
    I know "set in" means "start". My question is: Is "set in for" a phrase?

    No.2
    We can say "set to work". But in Random Dictionary there is "set about work". Does it mean the second phrase has been accepted?

    No.3
    We wnet along a road that led down into a valley, about a mile out of town, where there was a pond. I think the underlined parts are attributes. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: set in, set about, attribute or adverbial

    No.1
    A new economic recession has set in for that country.
    I know "set in" means "start". My question is: Is "set in for" a phrase?
    No, the group of words “set in for” is not a phrase. Here “for” is used as a preposition. Besides, the meaning of “set in” is not start. It means: Enter a particular state and/or get established. Winter has perfectly set in. The Sun set in the West.
    No.2
    We can say "set to work". But in Random Dictionary there is "set about work". Does it mean the second phrase has been accepted?
    “Set to work” is not acceptable. Set about work is acceptable, because “set about” means:
    to begin an action.

    No.3
    We went along a road that led down into a valley, about a mile out of town, where there was a pond. I think the underlined parts are attributes. Is that right?
    Yes, they qualify a noun ‘valley” in the preceding sentence.

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: set in, set about, attribute or adverbial

    Dear Manas,

    Thank you very much for your explanation.
    No.1
    Why "for" instead of "in" is used?
    No.2
    In my dictionaries there are many examples of "set to work" while there is only one example of "set about work".

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Manas Ranjan Mallick View Post
    No.1
    A new economic recession has set in for that country.
    I know "set in" means "start". My question is: Is "set in for" a phrase?
    No, the group of words “set in for” is not a phrase. Here “for” is used as a preposition. Besides, the meaning of “set in” is not start. It means: Enter a particular state and/or get established. Winter has perfectly set in. The Sun set in the West.
    No.2
    We can say "set to work". But in Random Dictionary there is "set about work". Does it mean the second phrase has been accepted?
    “Set to work” is not acceptable. Set about work is acceptable, because “set about” means:
    to begin an action.

    No.3
    We went along a road that led down into a valley, about a mile out of town, where there was a pond. I think the underlined parts are attributes. Is that right?
    Yes, they qualify a noun ‘valley” in the preceding sentence.

  4. #4
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: set in, set about, attribute or adverbial

    Why "for" instead of "in" is used?
    I think “for” is used to point a particular country. Otherwise you can say: A new economic recession has set in the USA.
    No.2
    In my dictionaries there are many examples of "set to work" while there is only one example of "set about work".

    I got the following definitions for “set to” from two dictionaries:
    Compact Oxford English Dictionary: informal, a fight or argument
    Chambers dictionary: (OLD-FASHIONED)
    to start working or dealing with something with a lot of energy and enthusiasm
    If we all set to we should be able to finish the job this afternoon.
    So “set to work” is being used but as per Chambers it is old- fastioned.


  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: set in, set about, attribute or adverbial

    Why "for" instead of "in" is used?
    I think “for” is used to point a particular country. Otherwise you can say: A new economic recession has set in the USA.
    This is missing a preposition. It's "set in" in the US. We don't like to repeat a word if we dont' have to, so when a phrasal verb includes a specific preposition, we try not to repeat that preposition right afterwards.

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