Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Wear/Put on

  1. #1
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Wear/Put on

    Wear your coat and don't take off your hat.

    Put on your coat and don't take off your hat.

    Are both sentences correct?

    Many thanks.

  2. #2
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,211
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Wear/Put on

    Both are correct. They have different meanings, however.

    "Wear your coat" is an imperative that says, in whatever circumstance you are describing in your context (is it raining? You didn't say.), the listener should wear a coat.

    "Put on your coat" is an imperative that says take your coat off the coat rack and put it on your body.

    "When you go out, you should wear your coat" works fine, but it really is talking about when you are out (or at least, stading in the doorway ready to go out).
    "When you go out, you should put your coat on" describes what you should do before or as you leave the house.

    Put it another way: You can wear your coat all day long. You can only put it on once (until you take it off, and then put it on again).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •