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Thread: loving you

  1. #1
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    Default loving you

    What is the different between

    I love you and loving you?

  2. #2
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: loving you

    Do you mean, what is the difference between "I love you" and "I am loving you"?

    First, let's move it down one notch on the emotion scale, and change love to like, just for this example (because otherwise we can get into discussions of "making love" which is not the point, I don't think).

    I like you vs I am liking you.

    When we speak of emotions such as love, like, hate, dislike, they are thought of as permanent, inate feelings. You can't turn them on and off, start and stop. So, the concept of present progressive "am liking" doesn't make sense, in most contexts.

    You can say I walk, or I am walking, because these are actions that start and stop. I walk to the store, suggests it is my habit to walk, rather than drive; I am walking to the store, suggests that at this moment I am walking there.

    It is possible to say "I am liking ... " in the right context. Perhaps you are listening to a political candidate, and he actually starts to make sense, to appeal to you. You might say to your friend, "I am liking what I am hearing." It suggests you are just getting there, to liking it, not quite convinced but well on your way.

    The concept doesn't work with love. With love, as you know, you are hit all at once and it is forever!

  3. #3
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: loving you

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post

    When we speak of emotions such as love, like, hate, dislike, they are thought of as permanent, inate feelings. You can't turn them on and off, start and stop.
    The concept doesn't work with love. With love, as you know, you are hit all at once and it is forever!

    Not quite. People stop feeling love for someone they used to love all the time.

    The McDonald's ad campaign not withstanding, usually we don't use those words in the progressive sense. The example above about "starting to like" being expressed as "liking" makes a lot of sense.

    The progressive is used to express the newness or temporary nature of the emotion.

    Pat is loving it at university. (Pat has recently started university and it's going very well. Jean sent a postcard from her trip to Hawaii "Loving it here!!" -- Her stay there is temporary.

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: loving you

    The original poster [if you sign up - it's free and quick - you can get e-mailed notifications when people post in 'your' threads] should note Barb's last example - you asked the difference between 'I love you' and 'loving you' ; the short answer is that one describes an event that is actually going on in the real world now, and one just refers to a process. But that answer's pretty unhelpful.

    The reason that you ask for a comparison of the two is that in some contexts - like that postcard from Hawaii - they both seem to say that something is happening. When someone writes, at the end of a letter. 'Missing you more than ever' they mean 'I am missing you...'



    b

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    Default Re: loving you

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Not quite. People stop feeling love for someone they used to love all the time.

    The McDonald's ad campaign not withstanding, usually we don't use those words in the progressive sense. The example above about "starting to like" being expressed as "liking" makes a lot of sense.

    The progressive is used to express the newness or temporary nature of the emotion.

    Pat is loving it at university. (Pat has recently started university and it's going very well. Jean sent a postcard from her trip to Hawaii "Loving it here!!" -- Her stay there is temporary.
    So you are saying -ing meaning temporary.
    For example, Mcdonald's catch phrase " I'm loving it" means that whoever said he/she is only temporary loving McDonlad's.

    I also found a song called "Loving you" by Elvis
    Loving You - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Why is he telling in his song that a he is only loving someone temporary and not forever? Wouldn't the song be much better if he changed it to "I love you " instead?

  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: loving you

    I wouldn't have chosen the word "temporary". I'd've used a word beloved of linguists (but not much used outside that world) - 'inchoative' , which means 'to do with starting up'. But in that Elvis song the continous is just continuous (I'm not sure if I have the right song, but I think the lyrics begin 'I'll spend my life just loving you').

    b

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    Default Re: loving you

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I wouldn't have chosen the word "temporary". I'd've used a word beloved of linguists (but not much used outside that world) - 'inchoative' , which means 'to do with starting up'. But in that Elvis song the continous is just continuous (I'm not sure if I have the right song, but I think the lyrics begin 'I'll spend my life just loving you').

    b
    Oh, that was only an example. I was just trying to point out that native speakers do use "loving you" especially in songs. What is the reason for them to often use "loving you " instead of "I love you"

    here are some more examples
    MINNIE RIPERTON - LOVIN' YOU
    Alicia Keys - Lovin' You
    Bon Jovi - All about loving you
    Kiss - I WAS MADE FOR LOVIN' YOU

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