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Thread: Of


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    #1

    Of

    Are these correct? What do these mean?

    1. I want six pieces of nuggets.
    2. I want six pieces of nugget.

    3. I want six slices of apples.
    4. I want six slices of apple.
    5. I want six slices of a apple.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Of

    I want six nuggets.
    I want six pieces of chicken.
    I want six apple slices.


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    #3

    Re: Of

    So these are wrong? Why?

    1. I want six slices of apples.
    2. I want six slices of apple.

    What do these mean?
    3. I have ten dollars worth of gas. (Okay, I get this one. 'Gas' is not countable.)
    What about these:
    4. I have ten dollars worth of apples.
    5. I have ten dollars worth of apple.
    Last edited by jack; 31-Oct-2004 at 21:29.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: Of

    1. I want six slices of apples. From more than one apple (OK)
    2. I want six slices of apple. From one apple (OK)
    3. I'll have ten dollars worth of gas. (OK) non-count
    4. I'll have ten dollars worth of apples. (OK) count
    5. I'll have ten dollars worth of apple. (OK) Iff 'apple' is modifying a non-count noun e.g., apple (sauce), apple (candy), apple (gas)


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    #5

    Re: Of

    Thanks.
    apple (gas)
    That made me laugh. I like your teaching style. I can have a good time while learning.

    What do these mean?
    1. I'll have ten dollars worth of apples. (Many apples?
    2. I'll have ten dollars worth of an apple. (One apple?)

    What do these mean?
    3. I can have a good time while learning.
    4. I can have a good time while I am learning.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Of

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks.
    That made me laugh. I like your teaching style. I can have a good time while learning.
    That's good to hear.

    What do these mean?
    1. I'll have ten dollars worth of apples. (Many apples?)
    2. I'll have ten dollars worth of an apple. (One apple?)
    You're right.

    What do these mean?
    3. I can have a good time while learning.
    4. I can have a good time while I am learning.
    Both are fine. If the subject of the independent clause and the subject of the dependent clause are the same, then the subject and the verb of the dependent clause are often omitted:

    I can have a good time while (I am) learning. (Same subject)
    While (I am) learning, I can have a good time. (Same subject)


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    #7

    Re: Of


    2. I want six slices of apple. From one apple (OK)

    2. I want six slices of (a/the) apple. (How come this is correct, without a determiner?)

    What do these mean?
    1. I want six slices of an apple.
    2. I want six slices of apple.

    3. It can do all sorts of things.
    4. It can do all sorts of thing.
    Last edited by jack; 18-Nov-2004 at 19:13.


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    #8

    Re: Of

    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. This printer can produce different shades of green.
    2. This printer can produce different shades of greens. ('Green' is not countable right? If it was, would it be 'greens'?)

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: Of

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. This printer can produce different shades of green.
    2. This printer can produce different shades of greens. ('Green' is not countable right? If it was, would it be 'greens'?)
    As a noun, 'green' refer to a color. By the way, 'greens' is synonymous with vegetables; e.g., Eat your greens!


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    #10

    Re: Of

    Thanks.

    So #2 is incorrrect right?
    1. This printer can produce different shades of green.
    2. This printer can produce different shades of greens.

    3. I have hundreds of apples. (Hundreds=many. So 'apple' is countable here right?
    4. I have hundreds of apple. (This is not correct right? Because 'apple' is not uncountable?)
    5. I have hundreds of an apple. (This sounds wierd, but it is correct right? Say that you have 'hundreds of apples from one apple'?)

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