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  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default ''check'', ''go over'', ''look into''

    Hi,

    I am looking for a synonym for "to check [out]" in the following sentence, please: ''I didn't check my email [out] last week.''. If I used "go over" or "look into" would the meaning be exactly the same?
    As to the following sentence, does "go over" mean the same as "check": "Let me go over the security system when it's in place, will you?"

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: ''check'', ''go over'', ''look into''

    A "going over" is a rather more thorough affair than "checking out" something.

    I could check out the security system by opening a door and seeing if an alarm rings. If I wanted to go over the system, I would be analyzing what doors and windows were secured, how the alarm worked, who was called in event of breach, etc.

    To check your e-mail is to quickly see if you received any, and from whom. To check out your e-mail is to see if it's working. Is the system down? (I don't think "check out your e-mail" or "check your e-mail out" is very common, or clear, in fact.)

    "Look into" is clearly an investigation of some sort. I will look into why that happened.

  3. #3
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: ''check'', ''go over'', ''look into''

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    A "going over" is a rather more thorough affair than "checking out" something.

    I could check out the security system by opening a door and seeing if an alarm rings. If I wanted to go over the system, I would be analyzing what doors and windows were secured, how the alarm worked, who was called in event of breach, etc.

    To check your e-mail is to quickly see if you received any, and from whom. To check out your e-mail is to see if it's working. Is the system down? (I don't think "check out your e-mail" or "check your e-mail out" is very common, or clear, in fact.)

    "Look into" is clearly an investigation of some sort. I will look into why that happened.
    Thanks!
    Is there a verb that could appropriately replace "check" in "check my email", please?
    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: ''check'', ''go over'', ''look into''

    read

  5. #5
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: ''check'', ''go over'', ''look into''

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Thanks!
    Is there a verb that could appropriately replace "check" in "check my email", please?
    Thanks again.
    It must be made clear that "check" and "check out" are two different verbs.

    jlinger said "check out your email" would be unusual. BUT "Check your email" is very common. I would say that it's the best verb. However, it doesn't necessarily mean "read your email", since you might have none.

    "To check your email" means to log on, open you email program, and look to see if you have any new mail. If you do, you would then read it.

  6. #6
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: ''check'', ''go over'', ''look into''

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It must be made clear that "check" and "check out" are two different verbs.

    jlinger said "check out your email" would be unusual. BUT "Check your email" is very common. I would say that it's the best verb. However, it doesn't necessarily mean "read your email", since you might have none.

    "To check your email" means to log on, open you email program, and look to see if you have any new mail. If you do, you would then read it.
    Thanks a lot, Raymott!
    I am trying to improve my vocabulary and sort of tired of using ''check the/your/my email'' all the time. I know Jlinger already kindly answered my question but I still wonder if there's another popular verb, phrasal verb or expression that fully replaces ''check'' in this context. I'd like to know your opinion as well.
    Thanks!
    Last edited by jctgf; 22-Oct-2008 at 19:47.

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