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Thread: rub off on

  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default rub off on

    Manfred Goertemaker, a professor at the University of Potsdam, explained that justified or not, many of the negative feelings Germans feel for President Bush have rubbed off on McCain.

    Hi,
    I wonder if I could replace "rubbed off on" by "passed" and maintain the meaning of the text intact, please.
    I also would like to know which verb or phrasal verb a native would naturally use in this sentence, apart from "rub off on".
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rub off on

    No, I don't think "passed" would do the deed. I think you might use, "become associated with" or "been transferred to" or "have tainted their opinion of."

  3. #3
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: rub off on

    Thanks a lot, Jlinger.
    I have another question about "to pass", please. Is it correct to use this verb to mean "to contaminate"? For example, "My wife passed the flu to me". How would a native say that, please? "I caught the flu from my wife"?
    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rub off on

    You are using passed in the correct sense, but if you ask how I would say it, I would say I got or caught the flu from her, or that she gave it to me. I would probably use the latter, as I would prefer to transfer the blame to her spreading her germs, rather than my own careless lack of washing my hands.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: rub off on

    Iím not a teacher.

    Hi jctgf,

    I would venture my opinion concerning the matter in question:

    Manfred Goertemaker, a professor at the University of Potsdam, explained that justified or not, many of the negative feelings Germans feel for President Bush have rubbed off on McCain.

    Manfred Goertemaker, a professor at the University of Potsdam, explained that justified or not, many of the negative feelings Germans feel for President Bush have reflected unfavourable on McCain.

    Regards,

    V.

  6. #6
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: rub off on

    I would substitute:

    have been transferred to

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