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  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default tilt, lean, incline?

    Hi there,

    Do these verbs convey the same meaning, please? If so, which one is more used by the natives? are the following examples correct, please?

    The pole is tilted/inclined/leaning towards the fence.

    She's tilting/inclining/leaning toward the other candidate this year.

    The dog tilts/inclines its head when it's confused and trying to understand the owner's commands.

    She leaned/tilted/inclined her head on my shoulder and cried.

    I don't know why people like to tilt/incline/lean the head when posing for a photo.


    The wall is dangerously tilted/inclined and may fall at any time now.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: tilt, lean, incline?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi there,

    Do these verbs convey the same meaning, please? If so, which one is more used by the natives? are the following examples correct, please?

    The pole is tilted/inclined/leaning towards the fence. All could be used; "leaning" is the most colloquial.

    She's tilting
    /inclining/leaning toward the other candidate this year.

    The dog
    tilts/inclines its head when it's confused and trying to understand the owner's commands.

    She
    leaned/tilted/inclined her head on my shoulder and cried. Though "rested" here would be more usual.

    I don't know why people like to
    tilt/incline/lean the head when posing for a photo.

    The wall is dangerously tilted/inclined and may fall at any time now. Leaning would also be usable in this.

    Thanks.
    ..

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: tilt, lean, incline?

    In the first, is the pole touching the fence or holding it up? If so, I was using 'leaning against'.

  4. #4
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: tilt, lean, incline?

    Hi Anglika,
    Thanks a lot.
    The sentence "She's tilting toward the other candidate this year." was extracted from Dictionary.com but I noticed that you didn't agree with it. Do you think that using "tilt" here is far-fetched?
    Thanks.

  5. #5
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: tilt, lean, incline?

    That is because the word "tilt" in that sentence means: thrust at someone with a lance or other weapon; it is meaning that she is aiming to upset the other candidate's campaign.

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