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  1. jwschang
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    #11

    Re: Usage of who and whom

    [quote="bea"]1.May I know [[[who]]]]would you like to talk to /speak to ? 2 May I know [[[whom]]]]would you like to talk to /speak to ?
    Which is correct?I think sentence 1

    Just saw your question. From what I know,
    1. We don't have to stick strictly to grammar, unless the usage really doesn't make sense.
    2. Sentence 1 is commonly used and is acceptable.
    3. Sentence 2 follows strictly the grammar regarding the objective case of WHO (which is WHOM).
    (a) "Whom" is the object of "like to talk to" (....would you like to talk to whom), and not of "may know".
    (b) In both sentences, the object of "may know" is not "who/whom", but the entire clause "who/whom would you like to talk to".

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #12

    Re: Usage of who and whom

    jwschang wrote:

    We don't have to stick strictly to grammar, unless the usage really doesn't make sense.
    That's a wonderful thing to say. I'm going to quote you. Thank you :)

  3. jwschang
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    #13

    Re: Usage of who and whom

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    jwschang wrote:

    We don't have to stick strictly to grammar, unless the usage really doesn't make sense.
    That's a wonderful thing to say. I'm going to quote you. Thank you :)
    I'm sure I'm not the first (nor will I be the last) to say that. Sticky grammar doen't help anybody but I'm not saying that we should throw it out the window. When a usage becomes generally accepted (like that who/whom sentence), it becomes generally accepted! And that's because amongst the "generally accepting" speakers are grammar experts themselves, I'm sure. But not the sticky ones though. Thanks, Casiopea, for saying a wonderful thing about my wonderful pronouncement. Hope you're having a good time with this thread.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #14
    I don't believe I have heard of sticky grammar before. Perhaps you could expand on that.

    :)

  5. jwschang
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I don't believe I have heard of sticky grammar before. Perhaps you could expand on that.

    :)
    Ah, it means grammar that sticks to your lips like Tarzan glue and won't let go, so you can't speak properly.

  6. RonBee's Avatar
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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by jwschang
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I don't believe I have heard of sticky grammar before. Perhaps you could expand on that.

    :)
    Ah, it means grammar that sticks to your lips like Tarzan glue and won't let go, so you can't speak properly.
    That kind of grammar wouldn't be good for me.

    :wink:

  7. jwschang
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by jwschang
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I don't believe I have heard of sticky grammar before. Perhaps you could expand on that.

    :)
    Ah, it means grammar that sticks to your lips like Tarzan glue and won't let go, so you can't speak properly.
    That kind of grammar wouldn't be good for me.

    :wink:
    We are of one mind. Wonder what Casiopea thinks of it. :wink:

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    #18
    I like the idea of sticky grammar.

  8. jwschang
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    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I like the idea of sticky grammar.
    It's pretty apt, I must say so myself. One can't speak properly with all that grammar glue. Grammar's suppose to help, not to hinder.

    Since I'm a new member, I do appreciate the responses. Some of my new-found friends in this forum may be interested to know that I'm writing a study course book on English, aimed principally at Chinese-speaking learners. :wink:

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    #20
    Nice to meet you and welcome to the forum. We do have quite a few Chinese speakers here, so I imagine many will be interested. I teach Asian students, so will welcome the chance to pick your brains sometimes.

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