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  1. #1
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    Default increase/increased

    "because...,the unemployment rate will increase." <--this sentence pattern is definitely correct.

    how about...if we say" because...,the unemployment rate will be increased."

    when we say a thing's number or quantity has increased,
    is that both of the expressions "will increase" or "will be increased" are acceptable? And the meaning here doesn't involve passive or active?

    i raise this question simply because i am quite confused after reading the book saying that participle form of a verb can fucntion as an adjective,

    eg.I am determined to do sth.
    the "determined" here doesn't convey a passive meaning,and it acts as an adjective to modify "I".

    so,the question is,can we always change some verbs into a participle and use it as an adjective in a sentence ?

    looking forward to seeing your reply,teachers.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    Main Verb
    a) the unemployment rate will increase.(Active)
    b) the unemployment rate increased. (Active)

    When an -ed word occurs with 'be' or 'has/had', it functions as part of that verb, as a participle:

    Past Participle
    b) the unemployment rate will be increased (Passive)
    c) the unemployment rate has increased (Present Perfect)
    d) the unemployment rate had increased (Past Perfect)

    When an -ed word occurs with a form of BE (i.e., is, am, are, etc.) it functions as an adjective:

    Adjective
    d) I am determined. (e.g., I am happy, I am sad, I am hot, etc.)

    Quote Originally Posted by alan
    So, the question is, can we always change some verbs into a participle and use it as an adjective in a sentence?
    That's pretty much the general rule.

    Verb: walk, add -ed => walked
    Past tense: I walked the dog. (Past Tense)
    Adjective: a walked dog. (Past Participle)
    Part of a verb: He has walked the dog. (Past Perfect: 'has' + past participle 'walked')

  3. #3
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    then, if that we can write "will increase" or "will be increased" to express the same idea?

    will increase = will + verb
    will be increased = will be + adjective
    Is that right???

  4. #4
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    moreover,+ed word occurs with a form of be,for example, "is" ,it functions as an adjective

    the tax is increased. <-- does it convey a passive meaning, or the "increased" is just an adjective here??

  5. #5
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    Quote Originally Posted by alan
    Then can we write "will increase" and "will be increased" to express the same idea?
    Yes, but be increased is passive.

    Quote Originally Posted by alan
    will increase = will + verb
    will be increased = will be + adjective
    Is that right?
    Active, Future: will (auxiliary) increase (main verb)
    Passtive, Future: will (auxiliary) be (main verb) increased (past participle, not an adjective).

    When an -ing word modifies a noun, it's called an adjective:
    EX: an increased amount

    When an -ing word modifies a verb, it's called a participle:
    EX: unemployment will be increased

    Words ending in -ing have two names:
    1) gerund (Noun)
    EX: Running is fun.

    2) participle (Modifier)
    EX: She is running. (Verb modifier = participle)
    EX: He is a running man. (Noun modifier = adjective)

    Gerunds always end in -ing; Participles have two different forms.
    1) Present participle: a word that ends in -ing
    EX: a running man (Adjective)
    EX: She is talking (Participle)

    2) Past participle: a word that ends in -ed or -en
    EX: a wooden box
    EX: a dreaded exam

    Use participles to modify nouns and verbs; Use gerunds as subjects and objects.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    hi teacher
    what will u fill in for these blanks ?

    1.As the tax rate _____, the government...
    2.As the unemployment rate _____, the government...

    a) increases
    b) is increased

    I think both of the answers are acceptable ,though,
    I regard

    "is increased" is more appropriate for "tax rate",as it can be changed by the goverment decision makers,the market or some other economic factors.

    "increases" is more appropriate for "unemployment rate", as it cant be passively changed ,but it's only an indication to show the factual number.

    what do u think ??? i really need your help as this kind of question has confused me for a long time!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    Quote Originally Posted by alan
    hi teacher
    what will u fill in for these blanks ?

    1.As the tax rate _____, the government...
    2.As the unemployment rate _____, the government...

    a) increases
    b) is increased
    As the tax rate/unemployment increases, ... (Present)
    As the tax rate/unemployment increased, ... (Past)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    no passive voice ?????????

  9. #9
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    Default Re: increase/increased

    moreover, what will be the cases where "is increased" (passive voice) is applicable ?

  10. #10
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